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12 Statues in Ottawa honoring Canada’s history

12 statues in ottawa

Are you planning a trip to Ottawa? It’s a beautiful city to visit in any season, for its architecture and its parks. As this is Canada’s national capital, there are many monuments and statues to various persons and events important to Canada’s history. While developing our Ottawa Tourist Scavenger Hunt, we identified several statues that are worth your time. More specifically, here are 12 statues, each honoring an individual significant to Canada’s history. Some monuments include many statues. A separate list of significant monuments has already been published.

12 Statues in Ottawa you should see

  1. Oscar Peterson Oscar Peterson
    • The monument commemorating Oscar Emmanuel Peterson (1925-2007), a Canadian-born Canadian jazz composer and pianist, is located near the National Arts Center, at the corner of Albert and Elgin Streets.
    • He won 8 Grammy Awards during his 60-year career and has published over 200 recordings. He is considered, by connoisseurs, as one of the greatest jazz pianists.
    • The sculpture is the work of Ruth Abernethy.
  2. Samuel de ChamplainSamuel de Champlain
    • Located atop Napean Point, Samuel de Champlain’s statue is unmistakable. Napean Point is where the Alexandra Bridge runs from Ottawa to Gatineau, close to the National Arts Gallery.
    • He explored and mapped the Ottawa River to the site of Ottawa in 1613. His statue is located where Samuel de Champlain took his solar observations during his 1615 expedition.
  3. terry foxTerry Fox
    • A statue of Terry Fox (1958-1981) is located on the south side of Wellington Street, facing Parliament.
    • He became well known in 1980 when he started his Marathon of Hope. Fox suffered a car accident in 1976 that triggered osteosarcoma, a form of cancer, in his leg. At the time, the only treatment possible is to amputate his leg.
    • He begins the Marathon of Hope with an artificial leg, jogging from the Atlantic Ocean in St. John’s, Newfoundland with the intention of traveling to the Pacific Ocean in Victoria, British Columbia.
    • After crossing the Atlantic Provinces, Quebec and much of Ontario, he stopped in Thunder Bay due to pain. Doctors discover metastases to his lungs. He died soon after.
  4. Wilfrid LaurierSir Wilfrid Laurier
    • A large statue of Sir Wilfrid Laurier is on Parliament Hill facing Wellington Street, close to the Rideau Canal.
    • Sir Wilfrid Laurier (1841-1919) was the first francophone Prime Minister and the 5th Prime Minister of Canada. Laurier is recognized as one of the best statesmen that Canada has known through its reconciliation policies in the westward expansion of Confederation, and compromises between French and English Canadians. He is today on the $ 5 bill.
  5. Sir Robert Laird Borden
    • Sir Robert Laird Borden (1854-1937) was the Prime Minister of Canada in the First World War. He also ensured the reconstruction of parliament and the reorganization of parliamentarians’ work during this reconstruction.
    • He gave women the right to vote (at the federal level) in 1918. His statue was installed on Parliament Hill in 1957.
  6. William Lyon MackenzieWilliam Lyon Mackenzie King
    • A bronze statue of the former prime minister is located behind Parliament. It was installed in 1967.
    • William Lyon Mackenzie King (1874-1950) introduced unemployment insurance, Canadian citizenship and family allowances in Canada.
  7. Queen Elizabeth II
    • A large statue of Queen Elizabeth II on horseback is also installed on Parliament Hill. She has been Canada’s monarch since 1952.
  8. Queen Victoria
    • A very large monument commemorating Queen Victoria (1819-1901) is on Parliament Hill.
    • Queen Victoria is important because she chose Ottawa as the capital of the Province of Canada in 1857.
    • In 1867 she proclaimed the act of confederation, making Canada a sovereign country with four provinces.
  9. Sir John A MacdonaldSir John A. Macdonald
    • A large monument honoring the 1st Prime Minister of Canada is located to the left of Parliament, between it and the east block.
  10. Lester Bowles Pearson
    • A bronze statue of Lester B Pearson (1897-1972) sitting on a chair stands behind the Parliament.
    • He adopted the Canadian flag, made Canada officially bilingual and bicultural, and introduced old-age pension as well as the universal health systems.
  11. Guerre des Boers WarBoer Wars Monument
    • Located in Confederation Park, this monument honors Canadian soldiers who fell in battle during this conflict between the British Empire and South Africa between 1899 and 1902.
  12. National First Nations’ Veterans Memorial
    • Another monument located in Confederation Park honors veterans of first nations involved in Canadian armed forces from the First World War to the present.

Try it

There are many other statues to be admired on Parliament Hill and throughout Ottawa. We invite you to try our Ottawa Tourist Scavenger Hunt. It is a 2-hour self-guided walking tour of the downtown area that you do with your smartphone (how it works). It costs $35 for a group of 2 to 6 persons. You’ll come across most of these statues. Moreover, you’ll enjoy solving the various challenges at each step of the way while learning about Ottawa’s and Canada’ history.

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11 Monuments in Ottawa

11 monuments in ottawa

Are you planning a trip to Ottawa? It’s a beautiful city to visit in any season, for its architecture and its parks. As this is Canada’s national capital, there are many monuments to various persons and events important to this country’s history. While developing our Ottawa Tourist Scavenger Hunt, we identified several monuments in Ottawa that are worth your time. More specifically, here are 11 monuments, each honoring an event or person in the nation’s history. Some monuments include many statues. However, a separate list of significant statues will appear soon.

11 Monuments to see in Ottawa

  1. Monument aux ValeureuxValiants Memorial
    • The Valiants Memorial commemorates 14 key figures in Canada’s military history. It was erected in 2006 and dedicated by Governor General Michaël Jean. The busts and statues, of natural size, were carved by Marlene Hilton Moore and John McEven.
    • These heroes come from 5 significant periods in Canadian history:
      1. French Regime (1534-1763)
      2. American Revolution (1775-1783)
      3. War of 1812 (1812-1815)
      4. World War I (1914-1918)
      5. World War II (1939-1945)
  1. Canadian Flags Monument
    • The Canadian Flags Monument features the 14 main flags of the country:
      1. That of Canada, those of the 10 provinces, as well as those of the 3 territories.
    • At the base of each flag is the province’s or territory’s coat of arms.
  2. Victoria Tower Bell
    • In 1916, the Parliament of Canada burned down, along with its Victoria Tower. It was smaller than the current Peace Tower. At the top of the Victoria Tower was a bell that rang the time.
    • She now stands exposed at the back of Parliament Hill.
  3. OursTerritorial Prerogative
    • Bruce Garner’s sculpture of a fish-eating bear standing on two legs is located on Sparks Ave at the corner of Metcalfe St.
  4. Millennium Fountain
    • In the old days, a public fountain sprang up for the villagers to collect drinking water before the arrival of the aqueducts. Millennium Fountain commemorates this past era.
  5. Flamme du CentenaireCentennial Flame
    • The Centennial Flame, located in front of the Canadian Parliament, first lit on January 1, 1967, on Canada’s centennial. The Prime Minister of the time, Lester B. Pearson, who is on the $ 50 bill, lit the flame.
  6. Colonel By Fountain
    • Located in Confederation Park, the Colonel By Fountain in the center of the park was inaugurated in 1955, before the park was dedicated. It was rebuilt in 1975.
  7. Peace Keepers’ Monument
    • A monument honoring Canadians who have participated in the various United Nations peacekeeping missions over the years is located in front of the National Arts Gallery, just north of the US Embassy.
  8. 1812 War Memorial
    • A monument honoring Canadians who participated in the War of 1812 stands in front of the east block on Parliament Hill.
  9. Ottawa Firefighters’ Monument
    • This Ottawa firefighters’ monument stands in front of City Hall on Laurier Avenue.
  10. place de la confederationNational War Memorial
    • This giant monument is located in the center of Confederation Square. King George VI dedicated the monument called Response in 1939.
    • It originally commemorated fallen Canadians from the First World War (1914-1918). In 1982, we honored soldiers from the Second World War (1939-1945) and the Korean War (1950-1953). Then in 2014, we also honored those who participated in the Boer War (1899-1902) and in Afghanistan (2001-2014).
    • The Tomb of the Unknown Soldier appeared in 2000 in front of the memorial.

There are many other monuments and statues on Parliament Hill, and elsewhere throughout Ottawa. We invite you to try our Ottawa Tourist Scavenger Hunt. It is a 2-hour self-guided walking tour of the downtown area that you do with your smartphone (how it works). It costs $35 for a group of 2 to 6 persons. You’ll come across most of these monuments and much more. Moreover, you’ll enjoy solving the various challenges at each step of the way while learning the history of Ottawa.

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15 Street Art in Midtown Manhattan to be enjoyed

15 street art in Midtown Manhattan

Do you love art? When you travel do you make it a point to see public monuments, sculptures, and statues? There is much street art in Midtown Manhattan to be seen.

In our research to develop a Tourist Scavenger Hunt in New York Midtown, we’ve come across much information, some of which can only be gleaned when doing the actual scavenger hunt.

However, we also wanted to share some of that information with you for your visit planning. Here are 13 pieces of street art in Midtown Manhattan, 7 of which are located within Bryant Park.

7 Street Art to see in Bryant Park

  1. William Cullen BryantWilliam Cullen Bryant
    • William Cullen Bryant (1794-1878) was an American romantic poet, journalist, and editor of the New York Evening Post. His statue is located prominently, incidentally, in Bryant Park.
  2. Gertrude Stein
    • Gertrude Stein (1874-1946) was an American novelist, poet, playwright and art collector. Her statue is located on the north side in Bryant Park.
  3. William Earl Dodge
    • William Earl Dodge (1805-1883) was a New York businessman, referred to as one of the Merchant Princes of Wall Street in the years leading up to the American Civil War. His statue is located on the north side of Bryant Park.
  4. Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
    • Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (1749-1832) was a German writer and statesman. He wrote, among other works, the poems Prometheus and the Sorcerer’s Apprentice. His bust is located on the south side of the park
  5. Josephine Shaw Lowell FountainJosephine Shaw Lowell Fountain
    • This magnificent fountain is on the west side of the park. Josephine Shaw Lowell (1843-1905) was a social worker and reformer. She is said to be the first woman to be honored by a major monument in New York City.
  6. José Bonifacio de Andrada e Silva
    • His full-bodied figure is located on 6th Ave near W 40th. José Bonifacio de Andrada (1763-1838) was a Brazilian statesman, naturalist, professor, and poet.
  7. Benito Juarez
    • Benito Juarez (1806-1872)’s bronze statue stands on the north-west corner of the park. He was a Mexican lawyer and liberal politician from the Oaxaca province.

8 Street Art to see elsewhere in Midtown Manhattan

  1. The Guardians: Hero
    • Erected in 2013, in the year of Italian Culture in the US, the Italian Ministry of Foreign Affairs donated this art piece by Antonio Pio Saracino. It is now located on the south side of W. 42nd, between 6th Ave and Broadway.
  1. Father DuffyFather Duffy
    • Located between 7th Ave and Broadway, W 46th and 47th stands Duffy Square. Francis Patrick Duffy (1871 to 1932) was a Canadian-American soldier, Roman Catholic priest, and military chaplain. He journeyed into the thick of battle to recover wounded soldiers and is the most highly decorated cleric in the history of the United States Army. He also conducted vital work in Hell’s Kitchen, 2 blocks to your left. You will find his statue here on the island that carries his name.
  2. George M CohanGeorge M. Cohan
    • Also located in Times Square, near Father Duffy’s statue, George M. Cohan’s (1878-1942) was a Broadway producer, playwright, composer, and actor.
  3. GlobeAtlas
    • Atlas is the Greek demigod carrying the weight of the world on his shoulders. He stands in front of St-Patrick’s Cathedral on 5th Ave, above 50th, on a 9-ft granite pedestal.
  4. Human Structures
    • Located at W 33rd St & 7th Ave, this tall art installation shows humans of all colors.
  5. James Gordon Bennett Memorial
    • Located at Herald Square, at E 33rd and Broadway, this memorial honors James Gordon Bennett (1795-1872). He was the founder of the New York Herald newspaper in 1835.
  6. Rockefeller Plaza Prometheus
    • This piece of art depicting Prometheus, the Greek god who brought fire to mankind, was unveiled at Rockefeller Plaza in 1934. It is the work of Paul Manship (1885-1966).
  7. Mankind FiguresMankind Figures (Maiden and Youth)
    • Unveiled in 1936, this art installation at Rockefeller Plaza is also the work of Paul Manship. Two figures face each other, flanking Prometheus from across the pool.

Note that Rockefeller Plaza itself, and its surrounding buildings, are covered with art sculptures, mosaics, and frescos.

Tourist Scavenger Hunts

We invite you to try our Tourist Scavenger Hunt in New York Midtown. This 2.5-hour guided walking tour takes you throughout Midtown Manhattan from Grand Central Terminal to Times Square, Rockefeller Center, and everything in between. You do it on your mobile phone (how it works).  It only costs $30 for your group (1 to 6 people). Moreover, you will enjoy this street art and much more while completing challenges and learning about Midtown’s history.

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14 Monuments to see in Philadelphia

14 monuments to see in Philadelphia

Do you love art? When you travel do you make it a point to see public monuments, sculptures, and statues? There are many monuments to see in Philadelphia.

Whether you are planning a visit Philadelphia, or if you live here but haven’t noticed these monuments to see in Philadelphia’s museum district, this list is for you.  In our research to develop a Tourist Scavenger Hunt in Philadelphia’s museum district, we’ve come across much information, some of which can only be gleaned when doing the actual scavenger hunt.

However, we also wanted to share some of that information with you for your visit planning. Here are 14 monuments to see in Philadelphia.

14 Monuments to see in Philadelphia

  1. Philadelphia City HallThomas Paine Plaza
    • Across from City Hall to the north, you will find Thomas Paine Plaza and collection of quirky monuments. These include larger than life board game tokens and pieces. The various pieces were designed by Daniel Martinez, and Renee Petropoulis and Roger White. This public art exhibit called “Your Move” saw its first day in 1996.
  2. 36 feet tall William Penn
    • This tall bronze statue stands atop Philadelphia’s City Hall. No building in this city was higher than the brim of his hat until 1987. The statue faces northeast towards Penn Treaty Park. Alexander Milne Calder sculptured this statue.
  3. Compass BFamilias Separadas
    • This giant compass including the positioning of zodiac symbols called Familias Separadas is in the center of City Hall’s courtyard. In particular, like the game pieces at Thomas Paine Plaza, this painted compass is larger than life. Michelle Angela Ortiza, artist, created this work of art for the city.
  4. LOVE
    • Love ParkYou will find the world-famous Love Sign in John F. Kennedy Plaza, commonly referred to as Love Park. This plaza is located northeast of City Hall, between it and Logan Square. Robert Indiana, artist, and sculptor is behind this public art installation.
  5. Paint Brush
    • Claes Oldenburg designed the Paint Brush located at Lenfest Plaza. Paint Brush, installed here in 2011, honors the act of painting. Moreover, the brush and glob of paint illuminate the plaza at night.
  6. Grumman Greenhouse
    • Grumman GreenhouseJordan Griska designed and sculpted the Grumman Greenhouse located at Lenfest Plaza. The Grumman Tracker II flew anti-submarine bombing missions during the cold war era. Griska obtained the decommissioned plane and folded the metal of the nose and body of the plane so that it appears to be crumbling into the platform. In addition, he turned the existing sections of the plane into working greenhouses. Ultimately, this lead to the name of the piece – Grumman Greenhouse.
  1. Benjamin Franklin Parkway
    • Benjamin Franklin PkwyThis broad avenue stretching from Logan Square to the Philadelphia Museum of Art is often compared to the Champs Elysées in Paris. Museums, parks, public art installations and flags line Benjamin Franklin Parkway. The tradition of displaying flags on the Parkway began in 1976 as a part of the bicentennial celebration. New flag hoisting occurs every year since then, on Memorial Day. They represent countries with significant populations living in Philadelphia. Flags hang in alphabetical order from Logan Square to the Philadelphia Museum of Art.
  2. Kopernick
    • A committee of Polish Americans commissioned this sculpture to honor Mikolaj Kopernik, known to most of us as Nicolaus Copernicus. Thereupon, it was erected on his 500th anniversary on Benjamin Franklin Parkway next to the Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter & Paul. Of course, Kopernik was the Renaissance astronomer who boldly theorized that the earth and other planets rotate around the sun. Indeed, Sculptor Dudley Talcott symbolizes the sun with stainless steel disks and the earth’s orbit with a 16-foot ring.
  3. Swann FountainSwann Memorial Fountain
    • Swann Memorial Fountain is the centerpiece of Logan Square. You will find it between Philadelphia’s City Hall and the Philadelphia Museum of Art, in the center of Benjamin Franklin Parkway.
    • Alexander Stirling Calder, son of the City Hall artist Alexander Milne Calder, sculpted the statues within the fountain. Indeed, it memorializes Dr. Wilson Cary Swann, founder of the Philadelphia Fountain Society. Because the fountain is equally visible from City Hall and from the Museum of Art, there is no doubt one of the most iconic fountains in the city. Inaugurated in 1924, the three bronze sculptures of Native Americans spouting water represent the city’s three main waterways. They are The Delaware River, The Schuylkill River, and the Wissahickon Creek.
  4. The Thinker
    • The Thinker represents the most famous sculpture by August Rodin. This reproduction stands on the lawn outside the Rodin Museum, located along the Benjamin Franklin Parkway. However, its original, sculpted in 1902, stands within the Musée Rodin in Paris. August Rodin was born in Paris in 1840 and died in Meudon, France, in 1917.
  5. Washington Monument
    • Philadelphia MuseumStanding in the oval at the foot of the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the Washington Monument presents George Washington sitting atop his horse in full ceremonial dress. He looks poised to lead a march down the Parkway. Allegorical figures surround his pedestal, while the lower levels portray “typical” American people and animals.
  6. Rocky
    • Located at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, adjacent to the famous Rocky steps, is a larger than life statue of Rocky Balboa holding his gloved hands in the air. In the first place, A. Thomas Schomberg sculpted this art piece commissioned by Sylvester Stallone in 1980 for the movie Rocky III, then it was installed here in 2006.
  7. Clothespin
    • Erected in 1976 by Oldenburg is the 45-foot steel Clothespin, directly across 15th Street and City Hall. In contrast, Center Square exists today where stood Philadelphia’s first waterworks in the 1800s. It was the first public water system in America to use steam for large-scale pumping.
  8. Aero Memorial
    • Paul Manship designed the Aero Memorial you will find in Aviator Park, in front of the Franklin Institute.

We invite you to try our Philadelphia – Museum District Tourist Scavenger Hunt. It is a 4-hour guided walking tour around Philadelphia’s museum district you do on your mobile phone (how it works).  It only costs $30 for your group. You will enjoy seeing these monuments, statues, and street art and much more while completing challenges and learning Philadelphia’s history.

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9 iconic Hollywood Street Art installations

hollywood street art

Do you love art? When you travel do you make it a point to see public monuments, sculptures, and statues? There is much Hollywood street art to be seen.

Whether you are planning a visit Hollywood, or if you live here but haven’t noticed these monuments to see in Hollywood, this list is for you.  In our research to develop a Tourist Scavenger Hunt in Hollywood, we’ve come across much information, some of which can only be gleaned when doing the actual scavenger hunt.

However, we also wanted to share some of that information with you for your visit planning. Here are 9 Hollywood street art installations you should check out.

9 Hollywood Street Art

  1. The Four Ladies of Hollywood
    • The Four Ladies of Hollywood monument honors five of its leading ladies from years past. Indeed, the 4 ladies represent the ethnic diversity of cinema’s leading ladies: Dorothy Dandridge (1922-1965), Anna May Wong (1905-1961), Dolores del Rio (1904-1983), and Mae West (1893-1980)
    • Moreover, Marilyn Monroe (1926-1962), at the very top of the gazeebo, played this iconic scene with her skirt caught in an updraft in “The Seven Year Itch” (1955).
    • You will find the Four Ladies of Hollywood at the intersection of N. La Brea Avenue & Hollywood Blvd.
  2. Winnie the PoohHollywood’s Walk of Fame
    • Hollywood’s Walk of Fame comprises over 2,600 stars on the sidewalks along 15 blocks of Hollywood Blvd and 3 blocks of Vine St. In fact, the original selection committee included the likes of Cecil B. DeMille (1881-1959), Samuel Goldwyn (1879-1974), Jesse L. Lasky (188-1958), Walt Disney (1901-1966), Hal Roach (1892-1992), Mack Sennette (1880-1960) and Walter Lantz (1899-1994). The first permanent stars appeared in 1960. Hollywood Chamber of Commerce administers the Walk of Fame
    • As a matter of fact, Gene Autry (1907-1998) is the only honoree to have a star in all 5 categories. Comparatively, Bob Hope (1903-2003), Mickey Rooney (1920-2014), Roy Rogers (1911-1998) and Tony Martin (1913-2012) have stars in 4 categories.
    • Indeed, the stars represent the best in music, cinema, television, radio and live Theater. However, a few exceptions exist. You can find 4 round Moon landing monuments at the corners of Hollywood and Vine.
    • They run along 15 blocks on Hollywood from La Brea to Argyle as well as 3 blocks on Vine.
  1. The Road to Hollywood: How Some of Us Got Here
    • Artist Erika Rothenburg’s inlaid mosaic trail throughout the Babylon Courtyard presents stories of The Road to Hollywood: How Some of Us Got Here. These mosaics are mostly located on the ground floor and circle the central fountain children enjoy running through.
  2. Babylon Courtyard
    • The Babylon Courtyard is located next to the Dolby Theatre at Hollywood & Highland. It boasts many shops, restaurants and public art pieces including replicas of set pieces from the 1916 film Intolerance. The film’s story starts in ancient Babylon, covers the life of Christ, renaissance in France and finally modern America (from a 1916 perspective.
    • The film was such a flop that they didn’t have the funds to tear down the massive sets built on Sunset Blvd at Hollywood. The reproductions include a large archway through which you can frame awesome pictures of the Hollywood Sign, and massive elephants on huge columns.
  3. The Hollywood Sign
    • Built 1923, the Hollywood sign originally read “Hollywoodland”. The large structure visible from miles around should have been up for only 18 months. However, it is still here 90+ years later, with a few letters missing. And as they say, the rest is history.
    • Although this is not strictly “street art” it is clearly visible from many vantage points in Hollywood.
    • If you want a much closer view of the Hollywood sign, we suggest visiting Griffith Observatory. As well if you have a car, you can drive up close on Durand Dr along which is a park you can take time to snap a few pics.
  4. Mexican FilmDolores Del Rio Mural
    • Located on Hudson at Hollywood, this mural depicts important films by one of Hollywood’s first Latina stars, Dolores Del Rio. Of course, the films presented on this mural are all Mexican films. Alfredo de Batuc painted this mural back in 1990.
  5. You Are The Star Mural
    • Located on Wilcox Ave at Hollywood Blvd, is a bizarre mural where it’s the stars that are looking at you! As a matter of fact, dozens of movie legends are sitting in this theatre from Superman and R2-D2 to James Dean and Cher.
  6. Hollywood High Mural
    • Painted on the west side of Hollywood High School, this large mural presents one of its alumni, Rudolph Valentino (1895-1926), who starred in “The Sheik” (1921).
    • This mural is visible when walking down Orange Drive just south of Hollywood Blvd.
  7. Amoeba MusicAmoeba Music Mural
    • Located on Sunset at Ivar, 2 blocks south of Hollywood, the Amoeba Music flagship store boast a large mural.

We invite you to try our Hollywood Tourist Scavenger Hunt. It is a 2-hour guided walking tour throughout the heart of Hollywood you do on your mobile phone (how it works).  It only costs $30 for your group. Moreover, you will enjoy seeing this Hollywood street art and much more

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11 Monuments to see in Old Montreal

11 monuments to see in Old Montreal

Do you love art? When you travel do you make it a point to see public monuments, sculptures, and statues? There are many monuments to see in Old Montreal.

Whether you are planning a visit to Old Montreal or if you live here but haven’t noticed these monuments to see in Old Montreal, this list is for you. In our research to develop a Tourist Scavenger Hunt in Old Montreal, we came across much information, some of which can only be gleaned when doing the actual scavenger hunt.

However, we also wanted to share some of that information with you for your visit planning. Here are 11 monuments to see in Old Montreal.

11 monuments to see in Old Montreal

  1. John Young Monument
    • You will find the John Young Monument at the corner of De La Commune and Marguerite d’Youville. This is in the western part of Old Montreal. John Young was the first Chairman of the Port Commission responsible for enlarging and developing the port. As a result, this statue of John Young faces the Old Port.
  2. SilophoneSilophone
    • The Silophone is a stone resonance structure. When in function, you stand within the 4 columns facing Silo #5 across the water and speak in your normal voice. You should hear your voice echoed back through the side speakers.
  3. Quai de l'horloge Montreal Clock Tower
    • Workers completed the Clock Tower in 1921. In fact, it is a memorial to Canadian sailors who died in WWI. This monument is accessible to the public and you can climb its 192-step staircase for an impressive 360-degree view of Old Montreal. Moreover, the Clock Tower is free and is open year-round from 11 am to 7 pm.
  4. St. Lawrence River Plaque2 Ships en-route to Chicago Sculpture
    • On the back side of Montreal’s Clock Tower is a carving of the first two sailboats to take the Saint-Lawrence River to reach Chicago, in Illinois. To get to Chicago from Montreal, they passed through several channels and many locks. Indeed, they had to navigate across lakes Ontario, Erie, Saint-Clair, Huron and Michigan.
  5. Nelson’s Column
    • Montrealers dedicated this column to the memory of Admiral Horatio Nelson. The column was unveiled in 1809, following his death, at the Battle of Trafalgar. You cannot miss it when you are at Place Jacques Cartier.
  6. Marguerite BourgeoysPlace Marguerite-Bourgeoys
    • This little park in front of the city’s financial services building is dedicated to Marguerite Bourgeoys. In particular, it presents sculptures of children jumping on stones in the water behind Marguerite Bougeoys. Marguerite Bourgeoys (1620-1700) joined Jeanne Mance (1606-1673) and Paul de Maisonneuve (1612-1676) here in Ville-Marie. Ville-Marie is the old name of Montreal. As a matter of fact, Pope Jean-Paul II canonized Marguerite Bourgeoys on 31 October 1982 and officially raised her to sainthood.
  7. Montreal’s Chinese Friendship Gate
    • On Saint-Laurent Boulevard at Viger Ave. is Montreal’s Chinese friendship gate signaling your entrance into Chinatown. Montreal’s Chinatown is not very large but very distinctively different from everything around it.
  8. Maisonneuve Monument
    • Sculptor Louis-Philippe Hébert unveiled the Maisonneuve Monument in 1895 in celebration Montreal’s 250th anniversary. It not only commemorates Maisonneuve, but also Charles Le Moyne, Lambert Closse, Jeanne Mance and the Iroquois. Charles Le Moyne was a military leader. Lambert Closse was the first intermediate governor of Montreal. Jeanne Mance is the founder of the Hôtel-Dieu de Montréal hospital, the first hospital in Montreal. The Iroquois are the principal natives who were here originally.
  9. Love Sign
    • Twin to Philadelphia’s original Love Sign, Montreal’s stand in front of LHotel Montreal. This is a boutique hotel which boasts much modern and pop-art within its colorful lobby.
  10. SculpureVoluptuous Man on Horse
    • This sculpture created in 1974 can also be found in front of LHotel Montreal. You will find it to the right of Montreal’s Love Sign. Fernando Botero, a figurative artist, and sculptor from Medellin Colombia, sculpted this work of art.
  11. Place de la Grande-PaixObelisk monument to pioneers
    • You will find the Place de la Grande-Paix de Montréal on Place d’Youville on the western end of Old Montreal. In fact, it is behind the Musée Pointe-à-Caillère. It was erected so as to honor the peace treaty that was signed here in 1801 by Sieu de Callière representing New-France with 39 Native nations.
    • The Obelisk here is a monument to Montreal’s pioneers. The city installed it here in 1893 it’s 250th anniversary. One of its four plaques details the names of Montreal’s first colonists.

We invite you to try our Old Montreal Tourist Scavenger Hunt. It is a 2 and a half hour guided walking tour around Old Montreal you do on your mobile phone (how it works).  It only costs $30 for your group and you will enjoy seeing these monuments, sculptures and statues and much more while completing challenges and learning Montreal’s history.