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10 San Francisco Neighbourhoods not to miss

10 san francisco neighbourhoods

When you travel do like to take in the local flavour and actually walk through some the city’s key neighbourhoods? Indeed, there are many worthy of note San Francisco neighbourhoods to see, visit and enjoy.

Whether you are planning a visit San Francisco, or if you live here but haven’t yet strolled through these neighbourhoods, this list is for you.  In our research to develop a Tourist Scavenger Hunt in San Francisco, we’ve come across much information, some of which can only be gleaned when doing the actual scavenger hunt.

However, we also wanted to share some of that information with you for your visit planning. Here are 10 San Francisco neighbourhoods not to miss.

10 San Francisco neighbourhoods you should see

  1. chinatownChinatown
    • Enter Chinatown through the Dragon’s Gate, 3 blocks north-east of Union Square. San Francisco’s Chinatown is the largest outside Asia and the oldest of its kind in North America. It was entirely rebuilt following the 1906 earthquake. It houses theatres, temples, teahouses and a whole lot of souvenir shops.
    • The first Chinese immigrants came to San Francisco in the early 1800s and settled here. They came fleeing the Opium Wars in search of a better life. They worked in the gold mines and later built the railroads. Chinese Americans were denied the opportunity to buy homes outside of Chinatown until the 1950s.
  2. Civic Center
    • The Civic Center is filled with Beaux Arts buildings such as the San Francisco City Hall, Asian Art Museum, and the War Memorial Opera House. It offers a more European feel in its layout of buildings, parks and avenues.
  3. Fishermans WharfFisherman’s Wharf
    • Fisherman’s Wharf was developed in the mid to later 1800s when Italian immigrant fishermen came to the city because of the gold rush. Italians, however, had no luck in their quest for gold. Much better skilled in the seafood trade, they settled the area and fished for the Dungeness Crab.
    • Today it is one of the biggest tourist draws as most harbour cruises and Alcatraz visits depart from here. Most bus tours also start their routs here. You will find a large number of local restaurants such as Gardino’s and the Chowder Hut Fresh Grill, as well as chain favourites like Applebee’s.
    • Two historic ships berth here at Pier 45. The USS Pampanito (SS-383, Balao class) is a decommissioned WWII submarine (served from 1944 to 1971) and the SS Jeremiah O’Brien which is a 1940’s Liberty Ship Memorial. The latter is a still active passenger vessel which served throughout WWII and beyond. It made its way to Normandy in 1994 to commemorate Operation Overlord.
    • Other attractions here include Madame Tussauds, the San Francisco Dungeon and Ripley’s Believe it or not.
    • When here, take the time to seek the historical signs that explain the history of the wharf, fishing and cooking. Another sign indicates the type of fish most caught around these parts such as the California Halibut, Pacific Sardine, California King Salmon and the Dungeness Crab.
    • Find out more in my post “10 Attractions to see at Fisherman’s Wharf in San Francisco
  4. painted ladiesHaight-Ashbury
    • The Haight-Ashbury neighbourhood is the perfect place to see long rows of individually unique Victorian homes. It extends east from Golden Gate Park and includes the Panhandle park between Fell and Oak Streets as well as the Buena Vista Park. This is where you will find Almo Square and the famous Painted Ladies.
  5. The Marina District
    • A waterfront neighbourhood facing the north between the Presidio and Fisherman’s Wharf. It is the stereotypical home to the city’s yuppies. The Palace of Fine Arts is in the Marina District.
  6. The Mission District
    • This traditionally Latino community has a lively nightlife. It is very popular among hipsters with its foreign cinema, family run restaurants and art galleries. It is located on the Bay side of San Francisco (east). Here you will find Mission Dolores and Mission Park.
  7. Grace CathedralNob Hill
    • Nob Hill is close to downtown San Francisco and Chinatown. It boasts Grace Cathedral which was inspired by Paris’ Notre Dame Cathedral. It is also home to the Fairmont San Francisco, the city’s main Masonic Lodge, the Cable Car Museum and Huntington Park.
  8. North Beach / Telegraph Hill
    • North Beach is one of the city’s oldest neighbourhoods and the birthplace of the Beat generation. It is rich in Italian pastries and restaurants. Here you will find Washington Square and the Coit Tower.
  9. Russian Hill
    • Russian Hill is one of the original “Seven Hills” of San Francisco but in fact is one of its 44. This neighbourhood dates to the Gold Rush era when settlers discovered a Russian cemetery at the top of the hill. Russian naval and merchant ships were regular visitors to San Francisco in the 19th century. This is where you will find the crookedest street in America: Lombard Street.
  10. SoMa (South of Market)
    • This previously industrial neighbourhood is rapidly becoming a cultural hub with museums, art galleries, nightclubs and restaurants. It is also home to the San Francisco Giants.

Tourist Scavenger Hunts

In summary, we invite you to try our San Francisco Tourist Scavenger Hunt. All in all, this 2-hour self-guided walking tour takes you through the heart of San Francisco. Also, you’ll complete challenges and discover your next destinations directly on your mobile phone (how it works).  In short, it costs $30 for your group but is currently free. Moreover, you will enjoy seeing San Francisco’s neighbourhoods while learning about San Francisco’s history.

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10 Museums in San Francisco

10 museums to see in San Francisco

Do you seek history or art when visiting a city? There are several great museums in San Francisco you should consider seeing on your next trip.

Whether you are planning a visit San Francisco, or if you live here, this list is for you.  In our research to develop a Tourist Scavenger Hunt in San Francisco, we’ve come across much information, some of which can only be gleaned when doing the actual scavenger hunt.

However, we also wanted to share some of that information with you for your visit planning. Here are recommendations for 10 museums in San Francisco to visit.

10 museums in San Francisco

  1. asian art museumAsian Art Museum
    • One of the largest Asian art museums outside Asia, its collections include artefacts from the last 6,000 years! It opened in 1966.
    • The Asian Art Museum is located across the street from San Francisco’s city hall in the Civic Center neighbourhood.
  2. The Cable Car Museum
    • The Cable Car Museum stands in the Washington-Mason powerhouse and car barn on Nob Hill.  It overlooks the engines and wheels that pull the cables for San Francisco’s famous trams. Take a gander at the history of the cable car here.
  3. California Academy of Sciences
    • The California Academy of Sciences is home to an aquarium, planetarium and a natural history museum. It is located within the Golden Gate Park. Entry starts at $13.
  4. de Young Museum
    • The de Young Museum stands within Golden Gate Park, across the music concourse from the California Academy of Sciences. It showcases American art from the 17th through the 21st century. These include modern and contemporary art, photography, textiles and consumes.
    • Admittance starts at $6.
  5. The Exploratorium
    • The Exploratorium, located on Pier 15 on the Embarcadero, is a hands-on science museum for all ages. Over 600 hands-on exhibits can be seen and enjoyed here. As well, enjoy gazing at the city skyline and the bay from the Bay Observatory.
  6. Maritime MuseumMaritime Museum
    • The Maritime Museum appropriate stands in the Aquatic Park Bathhouse Building. Correspondingly, the structure looks like an old white ocean liner. In the centre of the park, this art deco structure sits across the street from Ghirardelli Square.
    • Here you will find 35,000 items on display about the local maritime tradition around San Francisco.
  7. Palace of Fine Arts
    • The Palace of Fine Arts in San Francisco is the last remaining structure built for the 1915 Panama Pacific Exposition. This pink and beige stone building with arcade sits next to a pond. It is near the foot of the Golden Gate Bridge on the north side of San Francisco.
    • In light of its history and architecture, it now figures prominently on the National Register of Historic Places.
  8. San Francisco Art InstituteSan Francisco Art Institute
    • Art Institute, founded in 1971, is open most of the time during the day. Enter the courtyard, on your left, will be the Diego Revera room.  Proceed down the hall east until you get to the veranda (Zellerbach Quad). It overlooks North Beach, Fisherman’s Wharf, Coit Tower, Alcatraz Island and other sights.
    • Take note of the beautifully sculpted entrance to the Art Institute.
  9. San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA)
    • SFMOMA intended to be the 1st modern art museum on the west coast of the United States. Since 1935 when construction completed, renovations were undertaken across its 10 floors. It reopened eventually in 2016. As a result of this renovation, it now looks like a giant white meringue. Snohetta designed SFMOMA.
  10. Walt Disney Family Museum
    • The Walt Disney Family Museum is located within the Presidio grounds. It will immerse you in the life of Walt Disney, the man behind countless Oscar-winning and groundbreaking animated films. Entry starts at $13.

In summary, we invite you to try our San Francisco Tourist Scavenger Hunt. All in all, this 2-hour self-guided walking tour takes you through the heart of San Francisco. Also, you’ll complete challenges and discover your next destinations directly on your mobile phone (how it works).  In short, it costs $30 for your group but is currently free. Moreover, you will enjoy seeing San Francisco’s museums while learning about San Francisco’s history.

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14 of San Francisco’s iconic buildings

14 San Francisco's iconic buildings

Do you love architecture, or seeing buildings from your favourite film scenes? San Francisco is chock full of these as many productions had shot scenes in and around the neighbourhood. This post presents 14 of San Francisco’s iconic buildings.

Whether you are planning a visit San Francisco, or if you live here, this list is for you.  As a matter of fact, in our research to develop a Tourist Scavenger Hunt in San Francisco, we’ve come across much information, some of which can only be gleaned when doing the actual scavenger hunt.

However, we also wanted to share some of that information with you for your visit planning. Here 14 of San Francisco’s iconic buildings.

14 Historical and Iconic buildings to see in San Francisco

  1. The Castro Theatre
    • The Castro Theatre, designed by Timothy Pflueger, represents early Spanish Colonial style. In like manner, it evokes a Mexican cathedral. Equally impressive, the ceilings in this cinema house are breathtaking. The Castro neighbourhood rests west of the Mission District.
  2. Coit TowerCoit Tower
    • Lillie Hitchcock Coit donated to the city the necessary funds to build this art deco tower in 1924. Construction completed later in 1933 and the observation deck at the top opened for visitors. From the top, a full 360 view of the city and the bay is available and breathtaking. The elevator ride is 7$ (or so).
    • Further, there is a Christopher Columbus statue in the parking below, in Pioneer Park. The city’s Italian-American community donated it back in 1957.
  3. de Young Museum
    • The de Young Museum stands within Golden Gate Park, across the music concourse from the California Academy of Sciences. It showcases American art from the 17th,  18th, 19th, 20th and 21st centuries. These include modern and contemporary art, photography, textiles and consumes.
    • Admittance starts at $6.
  4. Ferry Building Marketplace
    • This food mecca rivals Seattle’s Pike Place Market. Constructed in 1898 overtop an original wooden 1875 Ferry House, it hosts regular farmer’s market and local artisans. Moreover, many unique shops and restaurants line its halls.
  5. Grace Cathedral
    • Grace Cathedral, on Nob Hill, took inspiration from Paris’ Notre Dame Cathedral. However, it is very different from Notre Dame where the glasswork and exterior stonework is concerned. It stands next to a Freemason Grand Lodge.
  6. Maritime MuseumMaritime Museum
    • The Maritime Museum appropriate stands in the Aquatic Park Bathhouse Building. Correspondingly, the structure looks like an old white ocean liner. In the centre of the park, this art deco structure sits across the street from Ghirardelli Square.
    • Here you will find 35,000 items on display about the local maritime tradition around San Francisco.
  7. Mission Dolores
    • Mission Dolores incredibly is the oldest, still-standing, structure in San Francisco, having survived the 1906 earthquake. Founded back in 1776 in order to bring Spanish settlers to the area. Henceforth, it ministered to the local Native Americans.
  8. painted ladiesPainted Lady Victorians
    • The world-famous Painted Ladies stand in the Haight-Ashbury neighbourhood. They look to the west at Almo Square. These Victorian homes, seen in so many films and postcards, are a beautiful sight indeed.
  9. Palace of Fine Arts
    • The Palace of Fine Arts in San Francisco is the last remaining structure built for the 1915 Panama Pacific Exposition. This pink and beige stone building with arcade sits next to a pond. It is near the foot of the Golden Gate Bridge on the north side of San Francisco.
    • In light of its history and architecture, it now figures prominently on the National Register of Historic Places.
  10. San Francisco City Hall
    • SF City Hall stands in the Civic Center district next to War Memorial Opera House and Asian Art Museum. It was build in Beaux-Arts style and could easily pass as the Capitol of California – however, that is in Sacramento.
  11. San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA)
    • SFMOMA intended to be the 1st modern art museum on the west coast of the United States. Since 1935 when construction completed, renovations were undertaken across its 10 floors. It reopened eventually in 2016. As a result of this renovation, it now looks like a giant white meringue. Snohetta designed SFMOMA.
  1. Mary’s Cathedral
    • Mary’s Cathedral is a very modern looking church with distinct architectural lines. As an illustration, some describe it as a Maytag washing machine agitator. In contrast, others ascribe it to a part of the female anatomy. You must see it for yourself in order to make up your own mind about it. Mary’s Cathedral stands between Japantown and Laguna Heights.
  2. The Sentinel
    • The Sentinel is a flatiron building in the Financial District owned by film director Francis Ford Coppola. In fact, this is where he maintains his office. Construction completed back in 1907 on this distinctive flatiron. To demonstrate its distinctiveness, copper graces most of its exterior surfaces.
  3. Transamerica PyramidTransamerica Pyramid
    • The Transamerica Pyramid opened in 1972. It keeps its name despite the corporation no longer occupying it. The Transamerica Pyramid, together with the Golden Gate Bridge, are likely the 2 most iconic visual markers of San Francisco.

In summary, we invite you to try our San Francisco Tourist Scavenger Hunt. All in all, it is a 2-hour self-guided walking tour throughout the heart of San Francisco. Also, you’ll complete challenges and discover your next destinations directly on your mobile phone (how it works).  In short, it costs $30 for your group but is currently free. Moreover, you will enjoy seeing San Francisco’s iconic buildings while learning about San Francisco’s history.

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11 Parks in San Francisco to enjoy

11 parks in San Francisco

Who doesn’t love a little walk in the park when travelling? It makes museum hopping and tourist traps melt away for a moment while reconnecting with nature. There are many parks in San Francisco that you should take time to see. Some are quite large, others not so much, but they all have their own charm.

Whether you are planning a visit San Francisco, or if you live here but haven’t noticed these parks, this list is for you. In our research to develop a Tourist Scavenger Hunt in San Francisco, we’ve come across much information, some of which can only be gleaned when doing the actual scavenger hunt.

However, we also wanted to share some of that information with you for your visit planning. Here are 11 parks in San Francisco.

11 parks in San Francisco

  1. Almo Square
    • Located in the Haight-Ashbury neighbourhood, Almo Square overlooks the city skyline and more importantly, the famous Painted Ladies (Victorian-style homes) seen in so many films (70+) and postcards.
  2. aquatic parkAquatic Park
    • Aquatic Park is located between the Bay and Beach St., between Hyde St and Van Ness Ave. It faces Aquatic cove and the Aquatic Park Pier from which awesome views of the Golden Gate Bridge and Alcatraz Island can be had.
    • Aquatic Park also houses the Maritime Museum in the Bathhouse Building, the art deco structure shaped like a boat in the centre of the park.
    • It is also across the street from Ghirardelli Square.
  3. Golden Gate Park
    • Golden Gate Park is one of the largest urban parks in the world. Beyond the vast greenery and water works it boast the California Academy of Sciences, the de Young Museum, the San Francisco Botanical Gardens, Japanese Tea Garden, Steinhart Aquarium, the Conservatory of Flowers as well as facilities for more than 20 sports.
  4. Grand View Park / Turtle Hill
    • Take the tiles Moraga steps up 666ft for outstanding panoramic views of the city. It isn’t so full of people because of the long staircase you need to walk up – it isn’t for everyone.
  5. Lafayette Park
    • Lafayette Park is partly a dog park but also houses tennis courts and children’s playgrounds. This park is in the Pacific Heights neighbourhood.
  6. Mission Dolores Park
    • Mission Dolores was the 7th mission build along the King’s road. The park is located 2 blocks south of the Mission itself. It offers great views of Mission District, Downtown and the San Francisco Bay. This park attracts up to 10,000 people on a sunny weekend day.
  7. The Presidio
    • The Presidio, a former military post, now stands as a national park. It offers spectacular views of the Golden Gate Bridge, the Bay and the Pacific Ocean.
  8. Coit TowerTelegraph Hill
    • Telegraph Hill is in North Beach, just east of Washington Square. Why the name Telegraph Hill? Because during the 1849 gold rush days, it was used as a signalling post. There was here a Semaphore telegraph which is a kind of tower which communicates signals to those you can see it by pivoting shutters also known as blades or paddles.
    • When walking on Telegraph Hill, listen and look for the Cherry-Headed Conures, a type of parrot only found here.
    • Pioneer Park stands atop of Telegraph Hill. Alcatraz Island, the bay and the San Francisco Oakland Bay Bridge to the right are all clearly visible from up here.
  9. Twin Peaks
    • These are in fact two uninhabited hills among San Francisco’s 43. They are more than 900 feet high, but not the highest, and offer outstanding views of the city, the bay and the Pacific Ocean. There is parking on the north peak from which you can simply take in the views, or go trail hiking.
  10. Union Square Park
    • North of Market St and southwest of the city’s Financial District, Union Square offers respite from the hustle and bustle of the city. It presents small grassy areas, many palm trees for shade and many seating areas.
  11. FirefightersWashington Square
    • Washington Square is one of the city’s first parks established in 1847. Facing the square is Saints Peter and Paul Church, completed in 1924. You will also find Mama’s restaurant and Liguria Bakery around this square in case you are hungry. There are as well many other restaurants around the park. You will also find here benches, public restrooms and water fountains to refresh you after that trek up and down Russian Hill.
    • At the centre of the square stands a bronze statue of Benjamin Franklin, installed in 1879, donated to the city by one of the few to make millions during the gold rush – Henry Cogswell, a dentist and investor. A time capsule was installed under the statue with objects from Cogswell. Washington Square opened in 1979, 100 years later.

We invite you to try our San Francisco Tourist Scavenger Hunt. It is a 2-hour guided walking tour throughout the heart of San Francisco you do on your mobile phone (how it works).  It only costs $30 for your group. Moreover, you will enjoy seeing these parks and much more while completing challenges and learning about San Francisco’s history.

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8 Attractions to visit in San Francisco

8 attractions to visit in San Francisco

Are you wondering which attractions to see in San Francisco? In our research to develop a Tourist Scavenger Hunt in San Francisco, we’ve come across much information. However, we wanted to share some of that information with you. Here are 8 attractions to visit in San Francisco. Note that a separate list outlines attractions specifically in the Fisherman’s Wharf neighbourhood.

8 attractions to see in San Francisco

  1. Alcatraz IslandAlcatraz Island
    • Alcatraz Island welcomed the 1st lighthouse in the Western United States. It became a federal penitentiary from 1934 until 1963 and has since become a must-see attraction. Consider booking your visit several months in advance due to regularly high demand.
  2. Coit Tower
    • Lillie Hitchcock Coit donated to the city the necessary funds to build this art deco tower in 1924. Construction completed later in 1933 and the observation deck at the top opened for visitors. From the top, a full 360 view of the city and the bay is available and breathtaking. The elevator ride is 7$ (or so).
    • Further, there is a Christopher Columbus statue in the parking below, in Pioneer Park. The city’s Italian-American community donated it back in 1957.
  3. Fisherman’s Wharf
    • Fisherman’s Wharf is more fully covered by another post. It boasts The USS Pampanito (a WWII submarine), Madame Tussauds Wax Museum, and Ripley’s Believe it or not. You will also find here Ghirardelli Square and many other attractions and restaurants.
  4. Powell Hyde turntableFriedel Klussmann Memorial Turnaround
    • The Friedel Klussmann Memorial Turnaround may also be called the Powell-Hyde Cable Car Turntable on several maps. It stands at Hyde and Beach Street. See here classic San Francisco cable cars arrive and turn around for their return trip to Powell street.
  5. Ghirardelli Square
    • The Ghirardelli Chocolate factory originally opened in this now converted exterior shopping mall. Indeed, restaurants and shops open daily, next to Aquatic Park.
    • In particular, Château de Blois in France’s Loire Valley served as inspiration for the Ghirardelli Square Bell Tower.
  6. Golden Gate Bridge
    • The distinctive orange bridge opened in 1937. The Golden Gate Bridge practically rhymes with San Francisco. There are many vantage points from which to enjoy seeing it, both from up-close and further away throughout the city and water’s edge. Moreover, many stops along our Tourist Scavenger Hunt offer terrific views of it.
  7. Lombard StreetLombard Street
    • Lombard Street extends east-west from The Embarcadero, in the North Beach neighbourhood, and ends at Presidio Blvd. It runs through Cow Hollow, Russian Hill.
    • However, Lombard Street is famous for a one block stretch between Hyde and Leavenworth Streets. It features 8 hairpin turns on a 27-degree angle. Beautiful flowerbeds flank its entire length.
  8. Pier 39
    • Pier 39 is in the Fisherman’s Wharf neighbourhood of San Francisco and has been covered by another post already. This Pier boasts the Aquarium of the Bay, as well as quite a few other attractions, shops and restaurants. Snap awesome pictures of Alcatraz and Angel Islands, the Golden Gate and Bay bridges from the edge of Pier 39. On the western side, sea lions bask in the sun for your viewing pleasure.

Tourist Scavenger Hunt

We invite you to try our San Francisco Tourist Scavenger Hunt. This 2-hour guided walking tour takes you through Fisherman’s Wharf, Russian Hill and North Beach. You do it on your mobile phone (how it works). It can take up to 3 hours to walk depending on where you stop along the way. In short, it usually only costs $30 for your group. On the other hand, it is currently FREE until we obtain 10 positive reviews on Google and Facebook. Moreover, you will enjoy seeing these museums and much more while completing challenges and learning about San Francisco’s history.

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10 Attractions at Fishermans Wharf in San Francisco

10 attractions at Fishermans Wharf

Are you planning a visit to San Francisco and are wondering which attractions at Fishermans Wharf you should check out? For the purpose of developing a Tourist Scavenger Hunt in the Fisherman’s Wharf neighbourhood of San Francisco, we’ve come across a lot of information which we thought we’d share with you.

Nestled between the bay and the neighbourhoods of North Beach and Russian Hill, Fisherman’s Wharf extends from Pier 39 to Pier 45 on the northern tip of San Francisco. To enumerate, here are 10 attractions at Fishermans Wharf.

10 attractions at Fishermans Wharf

  1. Aquarium of the Bay
    • The Aquarium of the Bay is located at Pier 39. Encounter up to 30,000 animals found in the San Francisco Bay and along the California coast. As a matter of fact, these include sharks, octopuses, jellies, river otters and much more.
  2. 7D Experience
    • The 7D Experience is located at the end of Pier 39 and takes you on a full motion 3D interactive attraction. That is to say that a few rides are available where you are a lawman in pursuit of the bad guys with a laser pistol.
  3. Sea Lion Center
    • Pier 39, is a regular haunt for Sea Lions and so the Sea Lion Center was created here as a non-profit offering free interpretive programs.
  4. USS PampanitoUSS Pampanito
    • The USS Pampanito (SS-383, Balao class) is a decommissioned WWII submarine. It served from 1944 until 1971. The USS Pampanito berths at Pier 45 and is behind the SS Jeremiah O’Brien, next to the Musée Mécanique.
  5. SS Jeremiah O’Brien
    • The SS Jeremiah O’Brien which is a 1940’s Liberty Ship Memorial. The latter is a still active passenger vessel which served throughout WWII and beyond. Moreover, it made its way to Normandy in 1994 to commemorate Operation Overlord. The SS Jeremiah O’Brien berths at Pier 45 and is in front of the USS Pampanito, next to the Musée Mécanique.
  6. Madame Tussauds San Francisco
    • Madame Tussauds is located on the Embarcadero near Piers 43 and 45. Here you will encounter a slew of A-list actors, sports legends and international icons. You can also experience the Spirit of San Francisco.
  7. Hornblower Classic Cable Cars
    • Hornblower Classic Cable Cars is a fleet of fully restored cable cars used for City Tours departing across from the World Famous Fisherman’s Wharf Sign. Indeed, these will take you around the city and the bay.
  8. red & white fleetRed and White Fleet
    • The Red and White Fleet operate several San Francisco Bay cruises or various durations. You will see famous landmarks up close such as the Golden Gate Bridge, Alcatraz Island and the San Francisco Oakland Bay Bridge. The Red and White Fleet operates from Pier 43 ½ .
  9. Ripley’s Believe It or Not!
    • Is there anything more touristy than Ripley’s? Yet there is a constant and steady stream of people walking in to check out the weirdest artefacts and stories in this Odditorium. It is located next to Madame Tussauds at Pier 43.
  10. The San Francisco Dungeon
    • The San Francisco Dungeon is an indoor interactive historic, dramatic and thrill ride that brings to life the Bay Area’s darker history. Experience 9 mini-plays reenacting the Gold Rush, the Barbary Coast criminal gangs, Alcatraz as well as Shanghai Kelly.

We invite you to try our San Francisco Tourist Scavenger Hunt. It is a 2-hour guided walking tour throughout the heart of San Francisco you do on your mobile phone (how it works).  It only costs $30 for your group. Moreover, you will enjoy seeing these attractions and much more while completing challenges and learning about San Francisco’s history.