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4 film locations in Ottawa

8 restaurants in Ottawa

Are you planning a trip to Ottawa? It’s a beautiful city to visit in any season, for its architecture and its parks. While developing our Ottawa Tourist Scavenger Hunt, we identified a few locations used in the filming of well-known movies we thought we’d share with you.

4 film locations in Ottawa

  1. Gare Union stationGovernment Conference Center

    • Built in the Beau-Arts style by the Canadian Pacific Railway in 1912, the Government Conference Center by the Rideau Canal faces the Chateau Laurier hotel and is very close to Parliament Hill. It was originally Ottawa’s Union Station, the main rail hub.
    • Today, this building serves to host various conferences and political activities such as the G20 in 2001. A section of the Berlin Wall was located in its entrance from 1991 until 2011 when it was moved to a museum.
    • In 1976, Shadows in an Empty Room with Martin Landau shot a few scenes here on Rideau St, as well as on Wellington further west.
  2. Lord Elgin Lord Elgin Hotel

    • The Lord Elgin Hotel was built in 1941 in the chateau style. It bears the name, like the road it is on, of James Bruce (1862-1863), 8th Earl of Elgin and first Governor General of United Canada. He was the official representative of the British Crown in this British province – before it became a country.
    • In 2013, Penthouse North a thriller with Michael Keaton shot scenes in Ottawa, including here on Elgin St.
  3. Centre National des ArtsRideau Canal

    • Colonel By, a prominent founder of Ottawa supervised construction of the Rideau Canal in 1832. It connects the Ottawa River here in Ottawa to the St. Lawrence River in Kingston, 202 kilometers away. Its original purpose was to transport logs to Kingston for the shipbuilding effort, hoping to prevent a war against the United States, which never happened.
    • In 1997, Batman & Robin shot scenes with Mr. Freeze (Arnold Schwarzenegger) in winter on the Rideau Canal.
  4. Château LaurierChateau Laurier

    • The Canadian Pacific Railway built Chateau Laurier hotel, today operated by Fairmont, 1912, in tandem with Union Station across the street.
    • In 1941, Captains of the Clouds with James Cagney shot scenes here in and around Chateau Laurier.

We invite you to try our Ottawa Tourist Scavenger Hunt. It is a 2-hour self-guided walking tour of the downtown area that you do with your smartphone (how it works). It costs $35 for a group of 2 to 6 persons. You’ll come across most of these film locations. Moreover, you’ll enjoy solving the various challenges at each step of the way while learning the history of Ottawa.

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12 Statues in Ottawa honoring Canada’s history

12 statues in ottawa

Are you planning a trip to Ottawa? It’s a beautiful city to visit in any season, for its architecture and its parks. As this is Canada’s national capital, there are many monuments and statues to various persons and events important to Canada’s history. While developing our Ottawa Tourist Scavenger Hunt, we identified several statues that are worth your time. More specifically, here are 12 statues, each honoring an individual significant to Canada’s history. Some monuments include many statues. A separate list of significant monuments has already been published.

12 Statues in Ottawa you should see

  1. Oscar Peterson Oscar Peterson
    • The monument commemorating Oscar Emmanuel Peterson (1925-2007), a Canadian-born Canadian jazz composer and pianist, is located near the National Arts Center, at the corner of Albert and Elgin Streets.
    • He won 8 Grammy Awards during his 60-year career and has published over 200 recordings. He is considered, by connoisseurs, as one of the greatest jazz pianists.
    • The sculpture is the work of Ruth Abernethy.
  2. Samuel de ChamplainSamuel de Champlain
    • Located atop Napean Point, Samuel de Champlain’s statue is unmistakable. Napean Point is where the Alexandra Bridge runs from Ottawa to Gatineau, close to the National Arts Gallery.
    • He explored and mapped the Ottawa River to the site of Ottawa in 1613. His statue is located where Samuel de Champlain took his solar observations during his 1615 expedition.
  3. terry foxTerry Fox
    • A statue of Terry Fox (1958-1981) is located on the south side of Wellington Street, facing Parliament.
    • He became well known in 1980 when he started his Marathon of Hope. Fox suffered a car accident in 1976 that triggered osteosarcoma, a form of cancer, in his leg. At the time, the only treatment possible is to amputate his leg.
    • He begins the Marathon of Hope with an artificial leg, jogging from the Atlantic Ocean in St. John’s, Newfoundland with the intention of traveling to the Pacific Ocean in Victoria, British Columbia.
    • After crossing the Atlantic Provinces, Quebec and much of Ontario, he stopped in Thunder Bay due to pain. Doctors discover metastases to his lungs. He died soon after.
  4. Wilfrid LaurierSir Wilfrid Laurier
    • A large statue of Sir Wilfrid Laurier is on Parliament Hill facing Wellington Street, close to the Rideau Canal.
    • Sir Wilfrid Laurier (1841-1919) was the first francophone Prime Minister and the 5th Prime Minister of Canada. Laurier is recognized as one of the best statesmen that Canada has known through its reconciliation policies in the westward expansion of Confederation, and compromises between French and English Canadians. He is today on the $ 5 bill.
  5. Sir Robert Laird Borden
    • Sir Robert Laird Borden (1854-1937) was the Prime Minister of Canada in the First World War. He also ensured the reconstruction of parliament and the reorganization of parliamentarians’ work during this reconstruction.
    • He gave women the right to vote (at the federal level) in 1918. His statue was installed on Parliament Hill in 1957.
  6. William Lyon MackenzieWilliam Lyon Mackenzie King
    • A bronze statue of the former prime minister is located behind Parliament. It was installed in 1967.
    • William Lyon Mackenzie King (1874-1950) introduced unemployment insurance, Canadian citizenship and family allowances in Canada.
  7. Queen Elizabeth II
    • A large statue of Queen Elizabeth II on horseback is also installed on Parliament Hill. She has been Canada’s monarch since 1952.
  8. Queen Victoria
    • A very large monument commemorating Queen Victoria (1819-1901) is on Parliament Hill.
    • Queen Victoria is important because she chose Ottawa as the capital of the Province of Canada in 1857.
    • In 1867 she proclaimed the act of confederation, making Canada a sovereign country with four provinces.
  9. Sir John A MacdonaldSir John A. Macdonald
    • A large monument honoring the 1st Prime Minister of Canada is located to the left of Parliament, between it and the east block.
  10. Lester Bowles Pearson
    • A bronze statue of Lester B Pearson (1897-1972) sitting on a chair stands behind the Parliament.
    • He adopted the Canadian flag, made Canada officially bilingual and bicultural, and introduced old-age pension as well as the universal health systems.
  11. Guerre des Boers WarBoer Wars Monument
    • Located in Confederation Park, this monument honors Canadian soldiers who fell in battle during this conflict between the British Empire and South Africa between 1899 and 1902.
  12. National First Nations’ Veterans Memorial
    • Another monument located in Confederation Park honors veterans of first nations involved in Canadian armed forces from the First World War to the present.

Try it

There are many other statues to be admired on Parliament Hill and throughout Ottawa. We invite you to try our Ottawa Tourist Scavenger Hunt. It is a 2-hour self-guided walking tour of the downtown area that you do with your smartphone (how it works). It costs $35 for a group of 2 to 6 persons. You’ll come across most of these statues. Moreover, you’ll enjoy solving the various challenges at each step of the way while learning about Ottawa’s and Canada’ history.

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11 Monuments in Ottawa

11 monuments in ottawa

Are you planning a trip to Ottawa? It’s a beautiful city to visit in any season, for its architecture and its parks. As this is Canada’s national capital, there are many monuments to various persons and events important to this country’s history. While developing our Ottawa Tourist Scavenger Hunt, we identified several monuments in Ottawa that are worth your time. More specifically, here are 11 monuments, each honoring an event or person in the nation’s history. Some monuments include many statues. However, a separate list of significant statues will appear soon.

11 Monuments to see in Ottawa

  1. Monument aux ValeureuxValiants Memorial
    • The Valiants Memorial commemorates 14 key figures in Canada’s military history. It was erected in 2006 and dedicated by Governor General Michaël Jean. The busts and statues, of natural size, were carved by Marlene Hilton Moore and John McEven.
    • These heroes come from 5 significant periods in Canadian history:
      1. French Regime (1534-1763)
      2. American Revolution (1775-1783)
      3. War of 1812 (1812-1815)
      4. World War I (1914-1918)
      5. World War II (1939-1945)
  1. Canadian Flags Monument
    • The Canadian Flags Monument features the 14 main flags of the country:
      1. That of Canada, those of the 10 provinces, as well as those of the 3 territories.
    • At the base of each flag is the province’s or territory’s coat of arms.
  2. Victoria Tower Bell
    • In 1916, the Parliament of Canada burned down, along with its Victoria Tower. It was smaller than the current Peace Tower. At the top of the Victoria Tower was a bell that rang the time.
    • She now stands exposed at the back of Parliament Hill.
  3. OursTerritorial Prerogative
    • Bruce Garner’s sculpture of a fish-eating bear standing on two legs is located on Sparks Ave at the corner of Metcalfe St.
  4. Millennium Fountain
    • In the old days, a public fountain sprang up for the villagers to collect drinking water before the arrival of the aqueducts. Millennium Fountain commemorates this past era.
  5. Flamme du CentenaireCentennial Flame
    • The Centennial Flame, located in front of the Canadian Parliament, first lit on January 1, 1967, on Canada’s centennial. The Prime Minister of the time, Lester B. Pearson, who is on the $ 50 bill, lit the flame.
  6. Colonel By Fountain
    • Located in Confederation Park, the Colonel By Fountain in the center of the park was inaugurated in 1955, before the park was dedicated. It was rebuilt in 1975.
  7. Peace Keepers’ Monument
    • A monument honoring Canadians who have participated in the various United Nations peacekeeping missions over the years is located in front of the National Arts Gallery, just north of the US Embassy.
  8. 1812 War Memorial
    • A monument honoring Canadians who participated in the War of 1812 stands in front of the east block on Parliament Hill.
  9. Ottawa Firefighters’ Monument
    • This Ottawa firefighters’ monument stands in front of City Hall on Laurier Avenue.
  10. place de la confederationNational War Memorial
    • This giant monument is located in the center of Confederation Square. King George VI dedicated the monument called Response in 1939.
    • It originally commemorated fallen Canadians from the First World War (1914-1918). In 1982, we honored soldiers from the Second World War (1939-1945) and the Korean War (1950-1953). Then in 2014, we also honored those who participated in the Boer War (1899-1902) and in Afghanistan (2001-2014).
    • The Tomb of the Unknown Soldier appeared in 2000 in front of the memorial.

There are many other monuments and statues on Parliament Hill, and elsewhere throughout Ottawa. We invite you to try our Ottawa Tourist Scavenger Hunt. It is a 2-hour self-guided walking tour of the downtown area that you do with your smartphone (how it works). It costs $35 for a group of 2 to 6 persons. You’ll come across most of these monuments and much more. Moreover, you’ll enjoy solving the various challenges at each step of the way while learning the history of Ottawa.

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7 Squares and Parks in Ottawa to experience

7 squares & parks in ottawa

Are you planning a trip to Ottawa? It’s a beautiful city to visit in any season, for its architecture and its parks. While developing our Ottawa Tourist Scavenger Hunt, we identified many public squares and parks in Ottawa that bring charm and history to this city.

7 Squares and Parks in Ottawa

  1. Parc de la ConfédérationConfederation Park
    • Confederation Park opened in 1967 to commemorate the centennial of the Canadian Confederation. Other monuments can be found in this park, including one for Aboriginal veterans, as well as the fountain in honor of Colonel By, founder of ByTown which became Ottawa.
    • Confederation Park presents several monuments, sculptures, a totem, and a fountain. There are several festivals and events presented here each year.
  2. place de la confederation Confederation Place
    • This triangular park is at the intersection of Elgin on the east and west, and Wellington on the north. In the center is the Canadian War Memorial with the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier. King George VI dedicated this monument named Response in 1939.
    • It originally commemorated fallen Canadians from the Great War (1914-1918). In 1982, we further honored soldiers from the Second World War (1939-1945) and the Korean War (1950-1953). Then in 2014, we also honored those who participated in the Boer War (1899-1902) and in Afghanistan (2001-2014).
    • The Tomb of the Unknown Soldier appeared in 2000 in front of the memorial.
  3. Trans-Canadian Trail
    • It is a walking trail along the Ottawa River. In fact, this network of recreational trails is the longest in the world, covering 23,000 km joining the Atlantic, Pacific, and Arctic Oceans. It started in 1992, on the 125th anniversary of Canada.
  4. Samuel de ChamplainNapean Point
    • Napean Point is located on the Ontario point where the Alexandra Bridge runs from Ottawa to Gatineau, behind the National Arts Galery.
    • You can see here a few large art installations from the National Arts Galery.
    • Near the summit, you’ll find one of the original bronze border marker posts located on the 45th parallel between the Canada-United States border. New border markers are made of granite.
    • On the summit, the grand statue of Samuel de Champlain is unmistakable. He explored and mapped the Ottawa River to the site of Ottawa in 1613. It is located where Samuel de Champlain took his solar observations during his 1615 expedition.
  5. Canal Rideau Rideau Canal
    • The Rideau Canal’s construction began in 1832 under the direction of Colonel By, who simultaneously founded Ottawa, called Bytown then. It connects the Ottawa River in Ottawa to the St. Lawrence River in Kingston, 202 kilometers away. Its original purpose was to transport logs to Kingston for ship-building to prevent a war against the United States, which never happened.
    • Today it mainly serves pleasure boaters in the summer and ice-skaters in the winter. It is the oldest lock system, in continuous operation in North America.
  6. Manjor's Hill ParkMajor’s Hill Park
    • Major’s Hill Park is located behind the Chateau Laurier hotel, between the Rideau Canal and Mackenzie Avenue.
    • In this park, you’ll find statues of Colonel By, Major Bolton who succeeded him, after whom this park is named, and their successors in establishing this town.
    • At one end of the park, near the National Arts Gallery, is the Tavern on the Hill where you can have a drink on the terrace while enjoying the awesome view of Parliament Hill.
  7. Jacques-Cartier Park
    • Located in Gatineau, on the edge of the Ottawa River between the Alexandra and Macdonald-Cartier bridges, Jacques-Cartier Park presents the Mosaïcultures exhibition in 2018 – grand sculptures made with living plants.
    • Established in 1933, this park covers 22 hectares. On the grounds is House Charron, built in 1826. You can see the National Arts Gallery and Parliament Hill from it.

Try it

We invite you to try our Ottawa Tourist Scavenger Hunt. It is a 2-hour self-guided walking tour of the downtown area that you do with your smartphone (how it works). It costs $35 for a group of 2 to 6 persons. You’ll come across most of these parks and plazas. Moreover, you’ll enjoy solving the various challenges at each step of the way while learning the history of Ottawa.

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14 iconic buildings in Ottawa you should see

14 iconic buildings to see in Ottawajpg

Are you planning a trip to Ottawa? It’s a beautiful city to visit in any season, for its architecture and its parks. While developing our Ottawa Tourist Scavenger Hunt, we identified many iconic buildings in Ottawa that sign the visual landscape of this city which we thought you should take time to admire.

14 iconic buildings in Ottawa

Gare Union station

  1. Government Conference Center

    • Built in the Beau-Arts style by the Canadian Pacific Railway in 1912, the Government Conference Center by the Rideau Canal faces the Chateau Laurier hotel and is very close to Parliament Hill. It was originally Ottawa’s Union Station, the main rail hub.
    • Today, this building serves to host various conferences and political activities such as the G20 in 2001. A section of the Berlin Wall resided in its entrance from 1991 until 2011 when it moved to a museum.
  2. Lord Elgin Hotel

    Lord Elgin

    • The Lord Elgin Hotel was built in 1941 in the chateau style. It bears the name, like the road it is on, of James Bruce (1862-1863), 8th Earl of Elgin and first Governor General of United Canada. He was the official representative of the British Crown in this British province – before it became a country.
  3. The post office on Sparksbureau de poste

    • This beautiful château and art-deco style building was built in 1939 as a Post Office. It has been classified as a national landmark. Note the inscription at 59 Sparks, a reference to a prior institution.
  4. Confederation Building

    • The Confederation Building was erected in 1931 for the ministry of agriculture, in the Chateau style, like the Chateau Laurier hotel. Many MPs have their offices here today.
  5. Justice BuildingÉdifice de la Conféderation

    • Also built in the Château style, the Justice Building opened in 1938 for the RCMP – Royal Canadian Mounted Police.
    • Ian Fleming’s novel « For Your Eyes Only » (1960), which became a film in 1981 with Roger Moore, brought James Bond to meet the RCMP here. It accurately describes the building and its interior. However, none of the 24 films in this franchise has set foot in Canada.
  6. Supreme Court of Canadacour supreme du canada

    • This institution is the highest judicial level in the country, hearing 40 to 75 cases per year. Decisions from the 9 judges are final. No appeal is possible. The only possibility of overthrowing or changing one of their rulings is an Act of Parliament, which must be voted by the House of Commons, or lower house of the government.
    • The cornerstone of this building was laid in 1939 by Queen Elizabeth, Queen Elisabeth II’s mother and spouse to King George VI. You may know her best as the Queen Mother. It was completed in 1946. However, there’s an error in the date on the cornerstone. The Queen faced bad weather in her Atlantic crossing and was delayed by 1 day to the ceremony. As it was already engraved, it was laid as such.
  7. Canadian Children’s Museum

    • GatineauLocated in Hull, across the Ottawa River from Parliament Hill, is the Canadian Children’s Museum.
  8. Canadian Museum of History

    • The national history museum is also located in Hull, next to the Children’s Museum. Its original name was the Canadian Civilisation Museum
    • Its goal is to collect and present objects that illustrate the human history of Canada and its cultural diversity.
  9. National Arts Gallery

    Manjor's Hill Park

    • This museum, founded in 1880 by the Governor General of the time who was married to Princess Louise, who was an artist. In 1882, the museum moved to Parliament Hill in the same building as the Supreme Court. It moved in 1911 to the Victoria Memorial Museum which later became the Canadian Museum of Nature. In 1962, it moved yet again to Elgin road near the British Embassy. Finally, it moved to its own new home in a large glass building on the northern point of Ottawa, in 1988.
  10. Canadian Parliament

    • Flamme du CentenaireThe Canadian Parliament was originally built between 1859 and 1878 in the Neogothic Style, similar to the Chateau Style. Inspired by French, English and Flemish architectural elements, its construction employed mostly wood.
    • In 1916, a great fire ravaged the central building. Only the library, at the back, escaped unscathed because of an employee’s quick reflexes in closing the firewall door connecting it to the central building. Stone comprises the bulk of the current building, completed in 1920. Keep in mind this construction occurred during World War One which ended in 1918.
    • The Parliament building houses the Senate, composed of 105 members, as well as the Chamber of House of Commons, composed of 338 representatives from all regions of Canada.
    • In the center, you can see the Peace Tower, built between 1919 and 1928, grander than the original Victoria Tower. The bell from the original tower stands exposed behind the parliament among other monuments. At its base is the Remembrance Chapel, dedicated to Canadians killed in armed conflict abroad.
    • The main entrance is Confederation Hall, commonly called the Rotunda.
  11. Château LaurierChateau Laurier

    • The Chateau Laurier hotel, today operated by Fairmont, opened in 1912. The Canadian Pacific Railway built it in tandem with Union Station across the street.
  12. Prime Minister’s Officebureau de premier ministre

    • The offices of the Prime Minister of Canada and the Privy Council are located to the front left of the Canadian Parliament Hill, on Wellington. It opened in 1889, built in the Second Empire style.
  13. United States Embassy to Canada

    • The American embassy in Canada is at 490 Sussex Promenade, next to Major’s Hill Park. It opened in 1999. The is the most important embassy in Ottawa, as well and the most impressive of American embassies around the world.
  14. Royal Canadian Mint

    • This museum is on the eastern edge of the downtown area. Learn how money gots designed and fabricated in Canada throughout its history. It stands next to the Ottawa River.

We invite you to try our Ottawa Tourist Scavenger Hunt. It is a 2-hour self-guided walking tour of the downtown area that you do with your smartphone (how it works). It costs $35 for a group of 2 to 6 persons. You’ll come across most of these buildings and much more. Moreover, you’ll enjoy solving the various challenges at each step of the way while learning the history of Ottawa.

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11 museums in Ottawa to discover

13 museums in Ottawa

Are you planning a trip to Ottawa? It’s a beautiful city to visit in any season, for its architecture and its parks. While developing our Ottawa Tourist Scavenger Hunt, we identified several museums in Ottawa on a variety of subjects.

We’ve limited our list to the downtown core and close proximity, while there are many others further around the city. They include 11 museums in Ottawa and 2 in Gatineau.

11 museums in Ottawa to discover

  1. Musée des gardes du Gouverneur GénéralGovernor General’s Footguard Museum

    • This museum is located on the east side of Ottawa’s City Hall on Laurier Avenue. The Governor General’s Footguard Museum faces Confederation Park along the Rideau Canal.
    • The Governor General’s guards service started in Quebec City in 1861. This military unit followed the Government when it moved to Ottawa in 1865. The museum was established in 1950.
  2. Ottawa’s Insectarium

    • This educational entomology center presents insects and tarantulas from around the world.
  3. bank of canada museumBank of Canada Museum

    • This entirely renovated museum presents exhibits on the economy and the role of the Bank of Canada in the Canadian economy. The museum opens daily from 10 am to 5 pm and is free to visit.
  4. Manjor's Hill ParkNational Arts Gallery

    • This museum, founded in 1880 by the Governor General of the time who was married to Princess Louise, who was an artist. In 1882, the museum was installed on Parliament Hill in the same building as the Supreme Court. It was moved in 1911 to the Victoria Memorial Museum which today is the Canadian Museum of Nature. In 1962, it moved yet again to Elgin road near the British Embassy. Finally, it moved to its own new home in a large glass building on the northern point of Ottawa, in 1988.
  5. bytown museumBytown Museum

    • Located at the entrance of the Rideau Canal is the Bytown Museum. It bears the original name of this city and presents the history of Ottawa.
  6. Museum of Greco-Roman Antiquities

    • This museum, situated within the University of Ottawa, began in 1975. Its daily collection presents the daily life of people in the 7th century B.C. up to the 7th century A.D.
  7. Canadian Museum of Agriculture

    • This museum is open daily and presents interactive exhibits on agriculture and food in Canada.
    • It is located on Queen Elizabeth Dr along Rideau Canal at the intersection of Somerset W.
  8. Canadian Nature Museum

    • Located on McLeod at the intersection of Metcalfe, the Canadian Museum of Nature aligns perfectly with parliament hill.
    • You’ll find here exhibits on the natural history of Canada, its flora and its fauna.
  9. Canadian War Museum

    • The Canadian War Museum is west of the downtown area. You’ll learn here about Canada’s military history from French colonization to the Great War up to today.
  10. Royal Canadian Mint

    • This museum is on the eastern edge of the downtown area. Learn how money was designed and fabricated in Canada throughout its history. It stands next to the Ottawa River.
  11. Laurier House

    • This manor built in 1878 was at different times, the residence of 2 past Prime Ministers. Sir Wilfrid Laurier, 5th prime minister, lived here from 1897 until his death in 1919. The Right Honorable William Lyon Mackenzie King inherited this house from Laurier’s widow. He stayed here from 1923 until his death in 1950.
    • He, in turn, bequeathed it to the Canadian Government. It almost became the official residence of the prime minister, but Louis St. Laurent chose 24 Sussex Dr in its stead.
    • You can visit the manor for free at 335 Avenue Laurier, east of downtown.

2 museums to discover in Gatineau

  1. GatineauCanadian Children’s Museum

    • Located in Hull, across the Ottawa River from Parliament Hill, is the Canadian Children’s Museum.
  2. Canadian Museum of History

    • The national history museum is also located in Hull, next to the Children’s Museum. Its original name was the Canadian Civilisation Museum
    • Its goal is to collect and present objects that illustrate the human history of Canada and its cultural diversity.

We invite you to try our Ottawa Tourist Scavenger Hunt. It is a 2-hour self-guided walking tour of the downtown area that you do with your smartphone (how it works). It costs $35 for a group of 2 to 6 persons. You’ll come across most of these museums and much more. Moreover, you’ll enjoy solving the various challenges at each step of the way while learning the history of Ottawa.