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6 Statues in Toronto you should see

statues in toronto

Are you planning a trip to Toronto? It’s a beautiful city to visit in any season, for its architecture and its many parks. While developing our Toronto Civic Center Tourist Scavenger Hunt and our Old Toronto Tourist Scavenger Hunt, we identified a few statues worth a look.

We’ve limited our list to the downtown core and harbourfront areas, where our scavenger hunts are located.

6 Statues in Toronto you should see

  1. Churchill MemorialChurchill Memorial
    • Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965) Memorial is located at the back left of Toronto’s City Hall. It was originally installed in 1977 elsewhere in Nathan Phillips Square but relocated in 2014.
    • Sir Winston Churchill was prime minister of Great Britain between 1940 and 1945, and again between 1951 and 1955. He is remembered especially for his leadership during World War II.
    • One of Churchill’s most famous speeches from the war is inscribed on the base of his statue.
  2. Sir Adam Beck statue
    • Sir Adam Beck (1857-1925) is commemorated opposite the South African War Memorial on University Ave near Queen St.
    • Adam Beck founded Ontario Hydro. This monument was unveiled in 1934
  3. TD CenterThe Pasture
    • A number of life-sized bronze cows are lying down in the grass between the TD Center buildings. They were sculpted by Joe Fafard and installed in 1985.
  4. Immigrant Families Monument
    • A monument honoring Canada’s immigrant families is located next to the Scotiabank Arena on Yonge St. It was installed in 2007 and sculpted by Tom Otterness.
  5. Our Game
    • This statue/monument represents hockey players on the bench just itching to get on the ice. It is located on Front St just outside the Hockey Hall of Fame.
    • It was created by Edie Parker and installed in 1993.
  6. Glenn GouldThe Glenn Gould Gathering
    • Outside CBC’s headquarters on Front Street is a bronze bench on which Glenn Gould is sitting. It was designed by Ruth Abernethy and installed in 1999.
    • Glenn Gould (1932-1982) was a Toronto concert pianist who favored Johann Sebastian Bach.

We invite you to try our Toronto Civic Center Tourist Scavenger Hunt or Old Toronto Tourist Scavenger Hunt. They are 2-3 hours each, self-guided walking tours that you do with your smartphone (how it works). You’ll come across most of these statues and much more. Moreover, you’ll enjoy solving the various challenges at each step of the way while learning the history of Toronto.

They each cost $35 for a group of up to 6 persons. There is an Explorer version of the Old Toronto scavenger hunt available for $45 – it’s longer and has more challenges.

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9 Old Toronto Monuments to see while you’re here

9 old toronto monuments

Are you planning a trip to Toronto? It’s a beautiful city to visit in any season, for its architecture and its many parks. While developing our Old Toronto Tourist Scavenger Hunt, we identified many great Toronto monuments you should stop and admire.

We’ve limited our list to the downtown core and harbourfront areas, where our scavenger hunts are located.

9 Old Toronto Monuments

  1. 1927 monument to multiculturalismMonument to Multiculturalism
    • In front of Union Station is a Monument to Multiculturalism, designed by Francesco Perilli. It is the sculpture of a man in a globe with birds. This monument was unveiled on July 1, 1985, by the Mayor of the time, Arthur Eggleton. It was the 58th anniversary of Union Station, coinciding with Canada Day.
    • On the base of the monument are three charters of rights to which Canada adheres. However, it is often obstructed by food trucks and street vendors.
  2. Campsite Founding
    • In Simcoe Park is a monument called Campsite Founding, by Golden and Eichenberg. It was installed in 1994. It represents a long tent next to a pyramid fireplace.
  3. Triad
    • The Triad monument is located on Front Street near the Royal York. It was designed by Ted Bieler and installed in 1984.
  4. workers monumentMountain
    • Also in Simcoe Park, in front of the Campsite Founding, is Anish Kapoor’s Mountain monument made of aluminum, installed in 1995.
  5. Anonymity of Prevention
    • Also in Simcoe Park, along Front St, is a long monument honoring the numerous construction workers who’ve died in the line of work.
    • It was sculpted by Lo & Winkler and installed in 2000.
  6. Curtain Wall
    • Curtain Wall is a very large Trompe l’Oeil on the back side of the Gooderham Building, facing Berczy Park. It was designed by Derek Besant and installed in 1980.
  7. Between the Eyes
    • This very large monument made of steel resembles a rope bag holding 2 balls, bent in the center. It is located on Queens Quay at Yonge St and was designed by Richard Deacon.
  8. Salmon Run
    • Located in Bobby Rosenfeld Park between the CN Tower and Rogers Center is this circular fountain with many steel and granite salmons trying to make it upriver.
    • It was sculpted by Susan Schelle and installed in 1991.
  9. The AudienceThe Audience
    • A number of larger than life fans extend from the northwest corner of Rogers Center. It was installed in 1989 and designed by Michael Snow.

We invite you to try the Old Toronto Tourist Scavenger Hunt. It is a 2-3 hour, a self-guided walking tour that you do with your smartphone (how it works). You’ll come across most of these monuments and much more. Moreover, you’ll enjoy solving the various challenges at each step of the way while learning the history of Toronto.

The regular scavenger hunt is $35 for a group of up to 6 persons. There is an Explorer version as well for $45 – it’s longer and has more challenges.

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7 Toronto Monuments to see around the Civic Center

7 Toronto monuments in the civic center

Are you planning a trip to Toronto? It’s a beautiful city to visit in any season, for its architecture and its many parks. While developing our Toronto Civic Center Tourist Scavenger Hunt, we identified many great Toronto monuments you should stop and admire.

We’ve limited our list to the downtown core and harbourfront areas, where our scavenger hunts are located.

7 Toronto Civic Center Monuments

  1. Nathan Phillips Square City HallThe Arches of Nathan Phillips Square
    • The Arches over the water feature in Nathan Phillips Square are named the Freedom Arches
  2. Canadian Flags Monument
    • On Bay Street, between Toronto’s current City Hall and the Old City Hall, stands a grove of flags.
    • 18 flags in total are displayed here: 1 for Canada, 1 for each of the 10 provinces, 1 for each of the 3 territories, and 1 for the City of Toronto.
  3. All are equal before the law
    • This monument comprises of a slender and tall pyramid atop which is a plank. On opposite sides of the plank are a lion and a house cat, facing each other.
    • It is on the western edge of Nathan Phillips Square, close to Osgood Hall.
  4. Nathan Philipps SquareToronto Sign
    • A large Toronto sign is located in Nathan Phillips Square. It’s the ideal location for tourist selfies.
  5. South African War Memorial
    • Located on University at Queen Street, this large memorial commemorates Canada’s involvement in the Second Boer War in South Africa with Great Britain (1899-1902).
    • It was erected in 1910 and created by Walter Seymour Allward (1876-1955).
  6. Pillars of Justice
    • On University Avenue, close to the courts of justice, is a monument honoring the men and women who work in Ontario’s justice system.
    • It was designed by Edwina Sandys and installed in 2007.
  7. Flight Stop
    • Flight Stop is large number of Canadian Geese captured mid-flight, hanging from the glass ceiling of the Eaton Center, close to Queen Street.
    • It was created by Michael Snow and installed in 1979.

We invite you to try Toronto Civic Center Tourist Scavenger Hunt. It is a 2 hour, self-guided walking tours that you do with your smartphone (how it works). You’ll come across most of these monuments and much more. Moreover, you’ll enjoy solving the various challenges at each step of the way while learning the history of Toronto. The cost of for a group of up to 6 persons is $35.

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12 Statues in Ottawa honoring Canada’s history

12 statues in ottawa

Are you planning a trip to Ottawa? It’s a beautiful city to visit in any season, for its architecture and its parks. As this is Canada’s national capital, there are many monuments and statues to various persons and events important to Canada’s history. While developing our Ottawa Tourist Scavenger Hunt, we identified several statues that are worth your time. More specifically, here are 12 statues, each honoring an individual significant to Canada’s history. Some monuments include many statues. A separate list of significant monuments has already been published.

12 Statues in Ottawa you should see

  1. Oscar Peterson Oscar Peterson
    • The monument commemorating Oscar Emmanuel Peterson (1925-2007), a Canadian-born Canadian jazz composer and pianist, is located near the National Arts Center, at the corner of Albert and Elgin Streets.
    • He won 8 Grammy Awards during his 60-year career and has published over 200 recordings. He is considered, by connoisseurs, as one of the greatest jazz pianists.
    • The sculpture is the work of Ruth Abernethy.
  2. Samuel de ChamplainSamuel de Champlain
    • Located atop Napean Point, Samuel de Champlain’s statue is unmistakable. Napean Point is where the Alexandra Bridge runs from Ottawa to Gatineau, close to the National Arts Gallery.
    • He explored and mapped the Ottawa River to the site of Ottawa in 1613. His statue is located where Samuel de Champlain took his solar observations during his 1615 expedition.
  3. terry foxTerry Fox
    • A statue of Terry Fox (1958-1981) is located on the south side of Wellington Street, facing Parliament.
    • He became well known in 1980 when he started his Marathon of Hope. Fox suffered a car accident in 1976 that triggered osteosarcoma, a form of cancer, in his leg. At the time, the only treatment possible is to amputate his leg.
    • He begins the Marathon of Hope with an artificial leg, jogging from the Atlantic Ocean in St. John’s, Newfoundland with the intention of traveling to the Pacific Ocean in Victoria, British Columbia.
    • After crossing the Atlantic Provinces, Quebec and much of Ontario, he stopped in Thunder Bay due to pain. Doctors discover metastases to his lungs. He died soon after.
  4. Wilfrid LaurierSir Wilfrid Laurier
    • A large statue of Sir Wilfrid Laurier is on Parliament Hill facing Wellington Street, close to the Rideau Canal.
    • Sir Wilfrid Laurier (1841-1919) was the first francophone Prime Minister and the 5th Prime Minister of Canada. Laurier is recognized as one of the best statesmen that Canada has known through its reconciliation policies in the westward expansion of Confederation, and compromises between French and English Canadians. He is today on the $ 5 bill.
  5. Sir Robert Laird Borden
    • Sir Robert Laird Borden (1854-1937) was the Prime Minister of Canada in the First World War. He also ensured the reconstruction of parliament and the reorganization of parliamentarians’ work during this reconstruction.
    • He gave women the right to vote (at the federal level) in 1918. His statue was installed on Parliament Hill in 1957.
  6. William Lyon MackenzieWilliam Lyon Mackenzie King
    • A bronze statue of the former prime minister is located behind Parliament. It was installed in 1967.
    • William Lyon Mackenzie King (1874-1950) introduced unemployment insurance, Canadian citizenship and family allowances in Canada.
  7. Queen Elizabeth II
    • A large statue of Queen Elizabeth II on horseback is also installed on Parliament Hill. She has been Canada’s monarch since 1952.
  8. Queen Victoria
    • A very large monument commemorating Queen Victoria (1819-1901) is on Parliament Hill.
    • Queen Victoria is important because she chose Ottawa as the capital of the Province of Canada in 1857.
    • In 1867 she proclaimed the act of confederation, making Canada a sovereign country with four provinces.
  9. Sir John A MacdonaldSir John A. Macdonald
    • A large monument honoring the 1st Prime Minister of Canada is located to the left of Parliament, between it and the east block.
  10. Lester Bowles Pearson
    • A bronze statue of Lester B Pearson (1897-1972) sitting on a chair stands behind the Parliament.
    • He adopted the Canadian flag, made Canada officially bilingual and bicultural, and introduced old-age pension as well as the universal health systems.
  11. Guerre des Boers WarBoer Wars Monument
    • Located in Confederation Park, this monument honors Canadian soldiers who fell in battle during this conflict between the British Empire and South Africa between 1899 and 1902.
  12. National First Nations’ Veterans Memorial
    • Another monument located in Confederation Park honors veterans of first nations involved in Canadian armed forces from the First World War to the present.

Try it

There are many other statues to be admired on Parliament Hill and throughout Ottawa. We invite you to try our Ottawa Tourist Scavenger Hunt. It is a 2-hour self-guided walking tour of the downtown area that you do with your smartphone (how it works). It costs $35 for a group of 2 to 6 persons. You’ll come across most of these statues. Moreover, you’ll enjoy solving the various challenges at each step of the way while learning about Ottawa’s and Canada’ history.