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17 Toronto Festivals and when they are

17 toronto festivals

Are you planning a trip to Toronto? It’s a beautiful city to visit in any season, for its architecture and its many parks. While developing our Toronto Civic Center Tourist Scavenger Hunt and our Old Toronto Tourist Scavenger Hunt, we identified many Toronto festivals that take place along our routes.

We’ve limited our list to the downtown core and harbourfront areas, where our scavenger hunts are located.

17 Toronto Festivals

  1. Metro Toronto Convention CenterCanadian International AutoShow
    • Annual automotive expo with everything from the latest models to concept cars.
    • When: 3rd week of February
    • Where: Toronto Metro Convention Center
  2. Toronto ComicCon
    • Annual cosplay, comic traders, conference and celebrity photo op.
    • When: 3rd weekend of March
    • Where: Toronto Metro Convention Center
  3. Canadian Music Week
    • CNW is about celebrating local talent.
    • When: 2nd week of May
    • Where: In a large number of venues across the city. Many are located along Queen Street and elsewhere in the downtown area.
  4. Electric Island
    • Annual electronic music festival spread over 4-5 dates from May to September.
    • Where: Toronto Islands
  5. Young-Dundas SquareYonge-Dundas Square Ribfest
    • Annual rib tasting festival with 7 of Ontario’s top craft brewers.
    • When: 3rd weekend in May
    • Where: Yonge-Dundas Square
  6. Toronto Poutine Fest
    • Annual poutine tasting festival. Try over 50 different kinds!
    • When: last weekend of May
    • Where: Yonge-Dundas Square
  7. Inside Out LGBT Film Festival
    • Annual Toronto LGBT film festival.
    • When: last week of May
    • Where: TIFF Bell Lightbox
  8. North By Northeast Festival
    • Gaming, innovation, music acts and more across dozens of venues downtown.
    • When: 2nd week of June
    • Where: Yonge-Dundas Square mostly
  9. Nathan Phillips Square City HallToronto Outdoor Art Fair
    • TOAF is an alternative to traditional art shows as it is outdoors and wide open.
    • When: 3rd weekend of July
    • Where: Nathan Phillips Square
  10. Toronto Caribbean Carnival
    • Caribbean music, cuisine, dance, and performing arts take to the city!
    • When: end of July to mid-August
    • Where: across the city including Nathan Phillips Square and CN Tower
  11. Small World Music Festival
    • 3-day festival presenting music from around the world.
    • When: August
    • Where: Harbourfront Center
  12. Fan Expo Canada
    • Annual cosplay, comic traders, conference and celebrity photo op.
    • When: last weekend of August
    • Where: Toronto Metro Convention Center
  13. Toronto International Film Festival
    • TIFF is an annual film festival presenting many world premiers and industry galas.
    • When: 1st & 2nd weeks of September
    • Where: TIFF Bell Lightbox and other theatres across downtown
  14. Sony CenterJFL42
    • Just For Laughs interactive 10-day festival
    • When: September
    • Where: Sony Center of the Performing Arts
  15. The Word on the Street Festival
    • Annual outdoor book and magazine fair.
    • When: September
    • Where: Harbourfront Centre
  16. Nuit Blanche Toronto
    • Annual all-night contemporary art event.
    • When: 1st weekend of October
    • Where: Nathan Phillips Square
  17. Hockey Hall of FameHockey Hall of Fame Induction Weekend & Legends Classic
    • The annual event dedicated to Canada’s game.
    • When: November
    • Where: Hockey Hall of Fame

There are many other festivals throughout the city you might also like.

We invite you to try our Toronto Civic Center Tourist Scavenger Hunt or Old Toronto Tourist Scavenger Hunt. They are 2-3 hours each, self-guided walking tours that you do with your smartphone (how it works). You might walk through one of these festivals depending on when you do your scavenger hunt. You’ll definitely enjoy solving the various challenges at each step of the way while learning the history of Toronto.

They each cost $35 for a group of up to 6 persons. There is an Explorer version of the Old Toronto scavenger hunt available for $45 – it’s longer and has more challenges.

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21 films shot in Toronto and their locations

21 films shot in toronto

Are you planning a trip to Toronto? It’s a beautiful city to visit in any season, for its architecture and its many parks. While developing our Toronto Civic Center Tourist Scavenger Hunt and our Old Toronto Tourist Scavenger Hunt, we identified several film locations you might recognize from famous films.

We’ve limited our list to the downtown core and harbourfront areas, where our scavenger hunts are located.

21 films shot in Toronto and their locations

  1. The Kidnapping of the President (1980)
    • Scenes shot at Toronto City Hall
  2. Strange BrewStrange Brew (1983)
    • Scenes shot at the Casa Loma
  3. Camilla (1994)
    • Scenes shot at Elgin & Winter Garden Theatre Center.
  4. X-Men (2000)
    • Scenes shot at the Casa Loma and Roy Thomson Hall.
  5. American PsychoAmerican Psycho (2000)
    • Scenes shot at the TD Center on Wellington St.
  6. The Tuxedo (2002)
    • Scenes shot at Toronto City Hall and the Casa Loma.
  7. ChicagoChicago (2002)
    • Scenes shot at Osgood Hall, Union Station, the Casa Loma, as well as the Elgin & Winter Garden Theatre Center.
  8. Resident Evil: Apocalypse (2004)
    • Toronto City Hall’s distinctive look serves as a major focal point throughout the film.
  9. Crash (2004)
    • Scenes shot under the Gardiner Expressway
  10. The Pacifier (2005)
    • Scenes shot at the Casa Loma
  11. Cinderella Man (2005)
    • Scenes shot at the Fairmont Royal York Hotel
  12. The SentinelThe Sentinel (2006)
    • Scenes shot at Toronto City Hall
  13. REDRed (2010)
    • Scenes shot at Toronto City Hall
  14. Scott Pilgrim vs the World (2010)
    • Scenes shot at the Casa Loma
  15. Cosmopolis (2012)
    • Scenes shot at Union Station.
  16. Total Recall (2012)
    • Scenes shot at Union Station and under the Gardiner Expressway.
  17. Pacific Rim (2013)
    • A segment of Elizabeth Street, just north of Dundas, was turned into a Japanese war zone for the film Pacific Rim.
  18. Suicide SquadSuicide Squad (2016)
    • Yonge-Dundas square and southwards on Yonge St served to shoot the car chase scene between Batman and the Joker.
  19. The Shape of Water (2017)
    • Scenes shot at Elgin & Winter Garden Theatre Center.
  20. DC's TitansDC’s Titans (2018)
    • Scenes shot at the Casa Loma where it serves as Wayne Manor.
  21. The Umbrella Academy (2019)
    • Massey Hall is the concert hall where number seven plays her violin.

 

We invite you to try our Toronto Civic Center Tourist Scavenger Hunt or Old Toronto Tourist Scavenger Hunt. They are 2-3 hours each, self-guided walking tours that you do with your smartphone (how it works). You’ll come across most of these film locations and much more. Moreover, you’ll enjoy solving the various challenges at each step of the way while learning the history of Toronto.

They each cost $35 for a group of up to 6 persons. There is an Explorer version of the Old Toronto scavenger hunt available for $45 – it’s longer and has more challenges.

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6 Statues in Toronto you should see

statues in toronto

Are you planning a trip to Toronto? It’s a beautiful city to visit in any season, for its architecture and its many parks. While developing our Toronto Civic Center Tourist Scavenger Hunt and our Old Toronto Tourist Scavenger Hunt, we identified a few statues worth a look.

We’ve limited our list to the downtown core and harbourfront areas, where our scavenger hunts are located.

6 Statues in Toronto you should see

  1. Churchill MemorialChurchill Memorial
    • Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965) Memorial is located at the back left of Toronto’s City Hall. It was originally installed in 1977 elsewhere in Nathan Phillips Square but relocated in 2014.
    • Sir Winston Churchill was prime minister of Great Britain between 1940 and 1945, and again between 1951 and 1955. He is remembered especially for his leadership during World War II.
    • One of Churchill’s most famous speeches from the war is inscribed on the base of his statue.
  2. Sir Adam Beck statue
    • Sir Adam Beck (1857-1925) is commemorated opposite the South African War Memorial on University Ave near Queen St.
    • Adam Beck founded Ontario Hydro. This monument was unveiled in 1934
  3. TD CenterThe Pasture
    • A number of life-sized bronze cows are lying down in the grass between the TD Center buildings. They were sculpted by Joe Fafard and installed in 1985.
  4. Immigrant Families Monument
    • A monument honoring Canada’s immigrant families is located next to the Scotiabank Arena on Yonge St. It was installed in 2007 and sculpted by Tom Otterness.
  5. Our Game
    • This statue/monument represents hockey players on the bench just itching to get on the ice. It is located on Front St just outside the Hockey Hall of Fame.
    • It was created by Edie Parker and installed in 1993.
  6. Glenn GouldThe Glenn Gould Gathering
    • Outside CBC’s headquarters on Front Street is a bronze bench on which Glenn Gould is sitting. It was designed by Ruth Abernethy and installed in 1999.
    • Glenn Gould (1932-1982) was a Toronto concert pianist who favored Johann Sebastian Bach.

We invite you to try our Toronto Civic Center Tourist Scavenger Hunt or Old Toronto Tourist Scavenger Hunt. They are 2-3 hours each, self-guided walking tours that you do with your smartphone (how it works). You’ll come across most of these statues and much more. Moreover, you’ll enjoy solving the various challenges at each step of the way while learning the history of Toronto.

They each cost $35 for a group of up to 6 persons. There is an Explorer version of the Old Toronto scavenger hunt available for $45 – it’s longer and has more challenges.

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9 Old Toronto Monuments to see while you’re here

9 old toronto monuments

Are you planning a trip to Toronto? It’s a beautiful city to visit in any season, for its architecture and its many parks. While developing our Old Toronto Tourist Scavenger Hunt, we identified many great Toronto monuments you should stop and admire.

We’ve limited our list to the downtown core and harbourfront areas, where our scavenger hunts are located.

9 Old Toronto Monuments

  1. 1927 monument to multiculturalismMonument to Multiculturalism
    • In front of Union Station is a Monument to Multiculturalism, designed by Francesco Perilli. It is the sculpture of a man in a globe with birds. This monument was unveiled on July 1, 1985, by the Mayor of the time, Arthur Eggleton. It was the 58th anniversary of Union Station, coinciding with Canada Day.
    • On the base of the monument are three charters of rights to which Canada adheres. However, it is often obstructed by food trucks and street vendors.
  2. Campsite Founding
    • In Simcoe Park is a monument called Campsite Founding, by Golden and Eichenberg. It was installed in 1994. It represents a long tent next to a pyramid fireplace.
  3. Triad
    • The Triad monument is located on Front Street near the Royal York. It was designed by Ted Bieler and installed in 1984.
  4. workers monumentMountain
    • Also in Simcoe Park, in front of the Campsite Founding, is Anish Kapoor’s Mountain monument made of aluminum, installed in 1995.
  5. Anonymity of Prevention
    • Also in Simcoe Park, along Front St, is a long monument honoring the numerous construction workers who’ve died in the line of work.
    • It was sculpted by Lo & Winkler and installed in 2000.
  6. Curtain Wall
    • Curtain Wall is a very large Trompe l’Oeil on the back side of the Gooderham Building, facing Berczy Park. It was designed by Derek Besant and installed in 1980.
  7. Between the Eyes
    • This very large monument made of steel resembles a rope bag holding 2 balls, bent in the center. It is located on Queens Quay at Yonge St and was designed by Richard Deacon.
  8. Salmon Run
    • Located in Bobby Rosenfeld Park between the CN Tower and Rogers Center is this circular fountain with many steel and granite salmons trying to make it upriver.
    • It was sculpted by Susan Schelle and installed in 1991.
  9. The AudienceThe Audience
    • A number of larger than life fans extend from the northwest corner of Rogers Center. It was installed in 1989 and designed by Michael Snow.

We invite you to try the Old Toronto Tourist Scavenger Hunt. It is a 2-3 hour, a self-guided walking tour that you do with your smartphone (how it works). You’ll come across most of these monuments and much more. Moreover, you’ll enjoy solving the various challenges at each step of the way while learning the history of Toronto.

The regular scavenger hunt is $35 for a group of up to 6 persons. There is an Explorer version as well for $45 – it’s longer and has more challenges.

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7 Toronto Monuments to see around the Civic Center

7 Toronto monuments in the civic center

Are you planning a trip to Toronto? It’s a beautiful city to visit in any season, for its architecture and its many parks. While developing our Toronto Civic Center Tourist Scavenger Hunt, we identified many great Toronto monuments you should stop and admire.

We’ve limited our list to the downtown core and harbourfront areas, where our scavenger hunts are located.

7 Toronto Civic Center Monuments

  1. Nathan Phillips Square City HallThe Arches of Nathan Phillips Square
    • The Arches over the water feature in Nathan Phillips Square are named the Freedom Arches
  2. Canadian Flags Monument
    • On Bay Street, between Toronto’s current City Hall and the Old City Hall, stands a grove of flags.
    • 18 flags in total are displayed here: 1 for Canada, 1 for each of the 10 provinces, 1 for each of the 3 territories, and 1 for the City of Toronto.
  3. All are equal before the law
    • This monument comprises of a slender and tall pyramid atop which is a plank. On opposite sides of the plank are a lion and a house cat, facing each other.
    • It is on the western edge of Nathan Phillips Square, close to Osgood Hall.
  4. Nathan Philipps SquareToronto Sign
    • A large Toronto sign is located in Nathan Phillips Square. It’s the ideal location for tourist selfies.
  5. South African War Memorial
    • Located on University at Queen Street, this large memorial commemorates Canada’s involvement in the Second Boer War in South Africa with Great Britain (1899-1902).
    • It was erected in 1910 and created by Walter Seymour Allward (1876-1955).
  6. Pillars of Justice
    • On University Avenue, close to the courts of justice, is a monument honoring the men and women who work in Ontario’s justice system.
    • It was designed by Edwina Sandys and installed in 2007.
  7. Flight Stop
    • Flight Stop is large number of Canadian Geese captured mid-flight, hanging from the glass ceiling of the Eaton Center, close to Queen Street.
    • It was created by Michael Snow and installed in 1979.

We invite you to try Toronto Civic Center Tourist Scavenger Hunt. It is a 2 hour, self-guided walking tours that you do with your smartphone (how it works). You’ll come across most of these monuments and much more. Moreover, you’ll enjoy solving the various challenges at each step of the way while learning the history of Toronto. The cost of for a group of up to 6 persons is $35.

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9 Toronto Theatres that are beautiful inside and out

9 toronto theatres

Are you planning a trip to Toronto? It’s a beautiful city to visit in any season, for its architecture and its many parks. While developing ourToronto Civic Center Tourist Scavenger Hunt and our Old Toronto Tourist Scavenger Hunt, we discovered many beautiful Toronto theatres that you should see.

We’ve limited our list to the downtown core and harbourfront areas, where our scavenger hunts are located.

9 Toronto Theatres

  1. Ed Mirvish TheatreEd Mirvish Theatre
    • The Ed Mirvish Theatre is an opulent 2 balcony theatre where you can see musicals and plays on tour.
    • Who was Ed Mirvish (1914-2007)? He was a Toronto businessman, born in Virginia (USA). He moved to Toronto with his parents when he was 9 years old. He was a great philanthropist and theatrical impresario for the city of Toronto. He also managed Honest Ed’s, a large discount store, before Wal-Mart arrived in this city.
  2. Massey HallMassey Hall
    • It is a music concert hall. It opened in 1894 and was, with the Eaton Auditorium, the only 2 places to listen to a classical music concert in Toronto before 1982. That’s when the owners of Massey Hall opened Roy Thomson Hall south of King Street (next to the Royal Alexandra theatre we just mentioned.
    • This theater is named after Hart Massey who wanted a theater where you could enjoy a large non-religious choir. He did not want concert hall only for the rich, or that would be very large to maximize profits. He wanted a modest size place to attract music lovers of all social classes.
    • Several prominent artists have appeared here over the years, including Glenn Gould, Bob Dylan, Joe Satriani, Neil Young, Cream, the Dalai Lama and Winston Churchill.
  3. Elgin TheatreElgin and Winter Garden Theatre Center
    • The Elgin and Winter Garden Theater is a 2-balcony theater that features musicals, movie premieres and concerts. The Toronto International Film Festival (TIFF) uses this place among its theaters every year.
    • They are actually 2 theaters here, one above the other. This style of double theater is called the Edwardian style. It is the last such Edwardian theater to survive the world.
    • The Elgin Theater is at street level while the Winter Garden Theater is 7 stories higher. Marcus Loew’s opened them in 1913 to present vaudeville shows, as well as silent films. In 1928, the Elgin was converted to accommodate sound for the new “talking” films. The Winter Garden closed for about 60 years.
    • In 1969, Famous Players, a Canadian cinema chain, purchased the Elgin, and later sold it in 1981 to the Ontario Heritage Foundation. It introduced the musical Cats to Toronto here. After two years of complete renovations, the two theaters reopened in 1989.
    • The interior design of the Winter Garden Theater gives the impression of being outdoors, in a forest. A 90-minute guided tour is available on Thursdays and Saturdays before performances.
  4. Sony CenterSony Centre for the Performing Arts
    • The Sony Center for the Performing Arts is the third name for this theater, the largest in Canada.
    • It opened in 1960 as the O’Keefe Center. It changed its name in 1996 to the Hummingbird Center until 2007. Sony took over the rights in 2008 and undertook major renovations and reopened in 2010.
    • The first play presented here was a “pre-Broadway” show titled Camelot starring Richard Burton, Julie Andrews, and Robert Goulet. Musicals, ballet productions, traditional theater, and popular bands are presented here.
  5. Lawrence Centre for the Arts
    • Here is the St.Lawrence Center for the Arts. This theater opened in 1970 to commemorate Canada’s centennial (3 years late). There are 2 theaters in this center.
  6. Roy Thomson HallRoy Thomson Hall
    • Roy Thomson Hall is the home of the Toronto Symphony Orchestra. This concert hall originated in 1982. Its name comes from the donor who completed the construction, Roy Thomson, 1st Baron Thomson of Fleet, and founder of the Canadian publishing empire Thomson Corporation.
  7. Royal Alexandra TheatreRoyal Alexandra Theatre
    • The Royal Alexandra Theater, built in 1907 in the Beaux-Arts style, “Royal Alex” as the Torontonians call it, is the oldest theater in continuous operation in North America. Its interior is opulent. It features traditional theater plays and musicals, many of them from Broadway. It can seat 1497 people.
  8. Princess of Wales Theatre
    • The Princess of Wales Theater is just east of the Royal Alexandra Theatre. It is another large theater. This one can welcome 2000 people. Her name honors Princess Diana (Lady Di). In fact, she had given her consent to the use of her name. It opened in 1993.
  9. Factory theatre
    • This theatre on Bathurst at Adelaide presents new Canadian plays in a historic mansion.

 

We invite you to try our Toronto Civic Center Tourist Scavenger Hunt or Old Toronto Tourist Scavenger Hunt. They are 2-3 hours each, self-guided walking tours that you do with your smartphone (how it works). You’ll come across most of these theatres and much more. Moreover, you’ll enjoy solving the various challenges at each step of the way while learning the history of Toronto.

They each cost $35 for a group of up to 6 persons. There is an Explorer version of the Old Toronto scavenger hunt available for $45 – it’s longer and has more challenges.